Listening activity – Irish (Advanced) – C1

INTERMISSION (2003)

Fill in the gaps in the following sentences

  1. I want you to stay out of ____________________.
  2. I mean, he _________________ me, ma, breaks my heart …
  3. I saw her kissing some _________________
  4. So we hold the _________________ hostage, _________________ our identity.
  5. But _________________, man, it’s not about the money.
  6. And I wouldn’t recommend you get _________________, either.
  7. You and me. _____________ to ____________.
  8. Get ___________ of that old Ronnie you’re cultivating.
  9. Have I got a _________________ like?
  10. Step on the _________________ so I can climb back.

FIVE MINUTES OF HEAVEN (2009)

Fill in the gaps in the following sentences

  1.  I was 15 when I _________________ the UVF, the Ulster Volunteer Force.
  2. At that time there were _________ on the street, every week _________ bombs every day.
  3. And it was like we were under _________.
  4. You have to understand the ____________________.
  5. This is about men who have ___________________ the men they have ___________________ that you have become or something I don’t know.
  6. We want you to meet the man who ____________ your brother, face to face.
  7. He’s always there in my ___________ and I don’t know where to go.
  8. This is the question we all _____________________ the answer to. Truth and reconciliation.
  9. What’s at ___________? Is it possible?
  10. “Time will ___________, they say.” But the years just get heavier.
  11. The man shot my brother ___________ times in the head. The man is having the life of Riley.
  12. Do I _______________ his hand or do I kill him?

THE MIGHTY CELT (2005)

Fill in the gaps in the following sentences

  1. Do you wanna a ___________?
  2. What about this one Joe? He will be a champion. And he’s got ___________
  3. If I ___________ him to win, can I keep him?
  4. It’s like a __________________, get on.
  5. Don’t tell me … You asked her to get ______________________?

PDF version: Listening activity – Trailers – Irish – Advanced – femfy

Answers: Listening activity – Trailers – Answers – femfy

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To concede – Vocabulary (advanced)

to-concede-meaning-vocabulary-ielts-advanced-c2-c1-fce-femfy-free-english-materials-for-you

Example sentences:

  • Steve had to concede the rival another victory.
  • The company was forced to concede that items of private data had been illegally stored.
  • I don’t concede that I’m being unreasonable for merely trying to be rational about our living arrangement.

Visual thesaurus (source: http://www.visualthesaurus.com)

to-concede-visual-thesaurus-synonyms

In the news:

17-01-2017-03-09-38

Source:  Adam Withnall Gambia election: President Yahya Jammeh in shock defeat to former Argos security guard Adama Barrow, Independent

17-01-2017-03-13-12

Source: Hardik Vyas, Independent

17-01-2017-03-15-25.png

Source:  in Chicago and in Washington, The Guardian

Listening comprehension – Overpopulation – The Human Explosion Explained Video by Kurzgesagt

As always, I suggest that you read the vocabulary list before watching the video. You can find a pdf version of this listening comprehension below.

VOCABULARY

  • To skyrocket: to rise extremely quickly or make extremely quick progress towards success.
    Ex. Lipstick sales in South Korea have skyrocketed this year.
  • Fourfold: four times as big or as much.
    Ex. According to recent figures, 34000 people are infected, and the most aggressive form of the virus, HIV 1, which was unknown in the country until the 1990s, has increased fourfold in the past 13 years. 
  • Slums: a poor and crowded area of a city where the buildings are in bad condition.kibera_slum_railway_tracks_nairobi_kenya_july_2012
  • Pollution: the process of making air, water, soil etc dangerously dirty and not suitable for people to use, or the state of being dangerously dirty.
    pollution_in_maracaibo_lake                       alfedpalmersmokestacks
  • To sustain: to provide what is needed for (something or someone) in order to live, to exist, to continue, etc.
    Ex. She wasn’t capable of sustaining close relationships with men. 
  • Ungrounded: not based on facts.
    Ex. The socioeconomic exclusion of women, based on ungrounded discriminatory social definitions of female and male roles, affects not only women and their human rights but also the development of sustainable economies and the protection of the natural environment. 
  • Unprecedented: never having happened before, or never having happened so much.
    We are confronted by an unprecedented situation. 
  • To overrun: to enter quickly and be present in (a place) in large numbers and unwanted.
    Ex. The enemies overran the city last night.overran.jpg

 

  • Worse off: having less money or being in a more difficult situation.
    Ex. The rent increases will leave us worse off. 
  • Sanitation: the systems for taking dirty water and other waste products away from buildings in order to protect people’s health.
    Ex. A lack of clean water and sanitation were the main problems. 
  • Goods: things that are produced to be sold. 
  • Widely: to a large degree; a lot; by a large number of people; in or to many places.
    Ex. Taking notes while listening to a lecture is an important strategy that students use widely for increasing attention and retaining content. 
  • Flourished: to grow or develop well.
    Ex. The Etruscans had flourished from the seventh to the first century B.C. 
  • Emancipation: the process of giving people social or political freedom and rights.
    Ex. Religious fundamentalisms have had a tremendous negative influence on the processes of women’s emancipation. 
  • Supply: the amount of something that is available to be used.
    We have a good and lasting supply of fresh water. 
  • To lead: to show someone where to go, usually by taking them to a place; to be in control of a group, country, or situation.
    Ex. Simplicity can lead to greatness and the concentration of one’s powers. 
  • To drop: if a level or amount drops, it becomes less.
    Ex. Temperatures will drop tomorrow after another scorching day. 
  • Spike: a sudden, rapid increase in something.
    Ex. Public Health officials in the region warned schools about a spike in flu viruses. 
  • To overlook: to see something wrong or bad but decide to ignore it.
    Ex. I don’t want to overlook any opportunity. 
  • To catch up: to do something that should have been done before.
    Ex. New Member States will have a unique possibility to catch up really fast and sometimes to avoid some of our previous mistakes. 
  • From scratch: from a point at which nothing has been done yet.
    Ex. Actually, maybe we should start again from scratch.

Answer the following questions:

  • How many people were living on Earth in 1940?
  • When was the legend of overpopulation born? 
  • What is the demographic transition? 
  • When did the first stage of the demographic transition occur? What happened in this century? 
  • What were the main features of the industrial revolution?
  • What were the main features of the second stage of the demographic transitions? 
  • What about the third stage? 
  • What is the average of children per family today?
  • How many years did it take developed countries to reduce fertility from more than 6 children to less than 3? What about Bangladesh?

PDF version with answers: overpopulation-the-human-explosion-explained-free-english-materials-for-you

 

Tie the knot – English idiom

tie the knot meaning - idiom- vocabulary - getting married Free English Materials For You - femfy.jpg

Example sentences from the web:

  • A: When do you plan to tie the knot?
    B: Let me find a boyfriend first!
  • So when are you two going to tie the knot?
  • The girl I’m going to marry lives in Mauritius and she’ll have her own ideas about where she wants to tie the knot.

If you are curious about the origin of this idiom, check this: Tie the knot – Origin

“Tie the knot” in the news:

Just married! Ciara and Russell Wilson share first picture after fairy tale wedding in British castle with guests including Jennifer Hudson and Kelly Rowland 

Ciara and Russell Wilson are officially married.

The happy couple tied the knot in front of their closest friends and family – including Jennifer Hudson and Kelly Rowland – on Wednesday at a fairy tale castle in Cheshire. 

The bride wore a custom Roberto Cavalli gown as she exchanged vows with the Seattle Seahawks player at the UK’s stunning Peckforton Castle in front of their celeb pals. 

Source: Mail Online

Alabama quarterback Blake Barnett set to tie the knot

Source: Sporting News

 

Burning Millions’ Worth of Illegal Ivory

I suggest that you read the vocabulary list before watching the video ;-):

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fajplusenglish%2Fvideos%2F725281944279982%2F&show_text=0&width=560

VOCABULARY

TUSK => a very long, large tooth that sticks out of the mouth of an animal (such as an elephant, walrus, or boar)

tusk.jpg
TO GO UP IN SMOKE => to burn up completely

to go up in smoke meaning.jpg

Image source

STOCKPILE => a large supply of something that is kept for future use

stockpile meaning.jpg
TO TORCH => to set fire to (something, such as a building) deliberately : to cause (something) to burn
TRADE => the activity or process of buying, selling, or exchanging goods or services
STUNT => something that is done to get attention or publicity
TO BAN => to forbid, to prohibit; to say that something cannot be used or done
TO POACH => to hunt or fish illegally

Helena Christensen & Portrait Photographer Mary Ellen Mark Capture™ – Episode 7 LISTENING ACTIVITY

I suggest that you read the vocabulary list below before watching the video.

VOCABULARY

 

Hitch – hiking: to get a ride in a passing vehicle by holding out your arm with your thumb up as you stand on the side of the road.hitchhiking.gif


Scope:
the area or amount covered, reached, or viewed.
Ex. Romance questions are beyond the scope of the language forum.

Standstill: a condition in which all movement or activity has stopped.
Ex. This is an emergency, but the negotiations are at a virtual standstill.

Creepy:   strange or scary : causing people to feel nervous and afraid.
Ex. This is the creepy stalker woman from the surveillance video.

 To broom: to sweep the floor with a broom.

to broom meaning.jpg

To kick in: to start to have an effect or to happen.
Ex. The effects of the tranquilizer should begin to kick in within a few minutes.

Harsh: cruel or unkind.
Ex. She was quite harsh with the kids. She should be nicer to them.

Guarded: very careful about giving information, showing feelings, etc.

Vocal: expressing opinions and complaints in a public and forceful way.
Ex. Residents became vocal in their opposition to the plan.

To blow up: to make a photographic enlargement of.

Dull: boring, not exciting or interesting.

To tear up: to damage, remove, or effect an opening in.

Mind-blowing: extremely exciting or surprising.
Ex. The special effects in this film are pretty mind-blowing.

Goosebumps: small bumps on your skin that are caused by cold, fear, or a sudden feeling of excitement.

Downloadable PDF file: Helena Christensen & Portrait Photographer Mary Ellen Mark Capture™ Ep. 7 – VOCABULARY

Fill in the gaps in the following sentences:

  1. Helena Christensen: I ____________________ around the world when I was about 18-19 years old and I think my interest and passion for photography probably started on that trip. And then almost immediately that trip ended my _______________ _________________ started and so then I got to see the world.
  2. Voice-over: I’ve had the rare opportunity to meet many amazing photographers who moved through the different _________________ to create powerful images.
  3. Mark Seliger: I’m here with Mary Ellen Mark photojournalist and portrait photographer ___________ work has changed, I think, the _________ of modern photography.
  4. Mark Seliger: It was very ________________ to me because there was photojournalism but there was also this very ____________ and creative way that images were presented.
  5. Mary Ellen Mark: Magazines were like ______________ for me, they gave me this amazing opportunity to do my own work.
  6. Helena Christensen: When I’m behind the camera I seem to stop breathing because I get so ______________ by the moment. It’s almost like everything just came to a standstill.
  7. Mary Ellen Mark: The guy that ran the ______________ … We called him doctor death.
  8. Helena Christensen: You know what is strange about this photo? I don’t even know where I took it and the negative was ______________ together with a piece of paper so when I _______ it ____________ obviously all that white stuff which looks like ice on a window […].
  9. Helena Christensen: We don’t live in these areas so we are not ______________ the same ways. When you are in it, you feel it in a way that’s inexplicable.
  10. Helena Christensen: And it was one of those moments when you are like … your adrenaline … just … you know … __________ ________, because you’re like … oh, this is one of those.
  11. HelenaChristensen: It’s very harsh as Mary Ellen was saying. People are very ______________, more and more.
  12. Helena Christensen: That’s kind of what I feel you do with your portraits. You get the ___________ essence of these people no matter of how they are dressed up, no matter how they’re made up. You go right through to the _____________ of them.
  13. Mary Ellen Mark: When you are working with an actor you have to __________ control.
  14. Mary Ellen Mark: I think I have so much stronger pictures. For some reason, that picture became an ____________ picture.
  15. Helena Christensen: It’s very important and I feel with contact sheets which we are now losing because no one ever get contact sheets back anymore and sits with 24 or 26 images. But now that I _______ __ _____ at my old contact sheets, I see something completely different in some of the photographs that I would have never even … you know … been the least excited about maybe fifteen years ago …I’m now … Why didn’t I __________ this up?!?
  16. Mary Ellen Mark: Right when I was taking that picture the ____________ of the high school walked in … I thought he was gonna like throw me out … But he didn’t.

Downloadable PDF file (without answers):Helena Christensen & Portrait Photographer Mary Ellen Mark Capture™ – Episode 7 FILL IN THE GAPS

Downloadable PDF file (ANSWERS):Helena Christensen & Portrait Photographer Mary Ellen Mark Capture™ – Episode 7 ANSWERS