The TO-INFINITIVE and -ING (part 1)

When one verb is followed by another, we use the -ing form or the infinitive (with or without to. The form of the second verb depends on the first verb ;-).

Let’s learn them!

I hope this post helps you :-). 

verb + to infinitive English Grammar femfy Free English Materials For You.png

PDF version: verb+ to infinitive

I suggest that you take a look at Biggerplate.com for other amazing and informative mind maps!

VERB + TO INFINITIVE

  • (CAN/CAN’T) AFFORD
  • AGREE*
  • AIM
  • APPEAR
  • ARRANGE*
  • ATTEMPT
  • CHOOSE
  • DECIDE*
  • DEMAND*
  • DESERVE
  • FAIL
  • HOPE*
  • LEARN
  • MANAGE
  • NEGLECT
  • OFFER
  • OMIT
  • PLAN
  • PREPARE
  • PRETEND*
  • REFUSE
  • SEEM
  • TEND
  • THREATEN
  • (CAN’T) WAIT
  • WISH

Examples:

  • She can’t afford to lose that vote.
  • They agree to leave at 10:30 am.
  • * They agree (that) they would leave at 10:30 am.
  • We aim to launch next year.
  • Keep me posted on what you decide to do.
  • Your actions threaten to destroy everything we’ve worked for.

verb + object + to infinitive english grammar learning femfy.png

PDF version: verb + object + to infinitive

VERB + OBJECT + TO INFINITIVE

  • ADVISE *
  • ALLOW
  • ENCOURAGE
  • FORBID
  • FORCE
  • INVITE
  • ORDER 
  • PERMIT
  • PERSUADE*
  • REMIND*
  • TEACH*
  • TELL*
  • WARN*

Examples:

  • We would advise you to follow the same path.
  • The Administrative Board invites observers to attend its meetings.
  • We were trying to persuade the witness to testify.

Advise, allow, encourage, forbid and permit can be followed by -ING too when there is no object.

  • I would advise following the same path.
  • We do not allow smoking.

verb + (object) + to infinitive.png

PDF version: verbs + (object) + to infinitive

VERB + (OBJECT) + TO INFINITIVE

  • ASK
  • BEG
  • EXPECT*
  • HELP
  • INTEND
  • PROMISE
  • WANT

Examples:

  • I didn’t ask to work here.
  • I didn’t ask you to work here.
  • She begged him to read the story again.
  • We expect the economy to improve.
  • * We expect (that) the economy will improve.

verb + infinitive (without to)

PDF version: verb + infinitive (without to)

VERB + INFINITIVE (without to)

  • MODAL VERBS: can, could, may, might, must, needn’t, shall, should, will, would.
  • HELP (can be followed by the infinitive with or without to).
  • MAKE and LET (+ OBJECT) are always followed by the infinitive without TO.

Examples:

  • You can borrow my shirt.
  • She might go to Paris.
  • She helped (to) organise the party.
  • Don’t make me add this to the list.
  • After you finish, let the students copy it.

 

 

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Irregular verbs

It’s since a while that I am not uploading posts on grammar. In my opinion, for a beginner is not so easy to memorize irregular verbs, that’s why I decided to make mind maps and other resources on this topic. I hope you’ll find it useful.
Irregular verbs in English - mind map

You can download this mind map on Biggerplate (imx file). If you don’t have the possibility to open this kind of file, just download the image from Free English Materials’ Facebook Page (Album: Mind maps)

Since there are a lot of irregular verbs I decided to make smaller mind maps for each single group. In this way, it will be easier for you to read them.

Group one - one word

GROUP 1 – ONE WORD

  • cut
  • cost
  • hit
  • hurt
  • let
  • put
  • shut

Group two- two words

GROUP 2 – TWO WORDS

  • WITH ‘T’

    build/built
    – dream/dreamt
    – get/got
    – keep/kept
    – lend/lent
    – shoot/shot
    – send/sent
    – sit/sat
    – sleep/slept
    – spell/spelt
    – spend/spent

  • WITH ‘GHT’

    bring/brought
    – buy/bought
    – catch/caught
    – fight/fought
    – teach/taught
    – think/thought

  • WITH ‘D’

    – find/found
    – have/had
    – hear/heard
    – hold/held
    – make/made
    – pay/paid
    – read/read
    – say/said
    – stand/stood
    – tell/ told

  • SAME FORM FOR INFINITIVE AND PAST PARTICIPLE

    become/became
    – come/came
    – run/ran

English Irregular Verbs - Group 3.png
GROUP 3 – THREE WORDS

  • WITH ‘EN’

    – be/was-were/been
    beat/beat/beaten
    – bite/bit/bitten
    – break/broke/broken
    – choose/chose/chosen
    – drive/drove/driven
    – eat/ate/eaten
    – forget/forgot/forgotten
    – give/gave/given
    – hide/hid/hidden
    – ride/rode/ridden
    – rise/rose/risen
    – see/saw/seen
    – speak/spoke/spoken
    – steal/stole/stolen
    – take/took/taken
    – wake/woke/woken
    – write/wrote/written 
  • WITH ‘E’ – ‘WN’

    – blow/blew/blown
    draw/drew/drawn

    – fly/flew/flown
    – grow/grew/grown
    – know/knew/known
    – show/showed/shown
    – throw/threw/thrown 
  • WITH ‘I’- ‘A’- ‘U’

    begin/began/begun
    – drink/drank/drunk
    – ring/rang/rung
    – sing/sang/sung
    – swim/swam/swum

I’ll upload soon some quizzes on this topic. 😉

Difference between SUIT and FIT

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You can download this mind map (IMX file) here: Biggerplate

I don’t know why but I couldn’t upload the image like I usually do. That’s why it results so small and you can’t get the full-size version by clicking on it :-(. I’ll upload it on Facebook, so if you want to take a look, click on this link: Mind Maps .

Collocations with ‘journey’

I made this mind map because students often confuse these collocations. In this way, I hope it will be easier for you to remember the most common verbs you can use with this word.

Collocations with 'journey'

Download the pdf version of this mind map: Verbs + journey or the imx file available on Biggerplate.

These are the most common collocations with ‘journey’ + adjective or adjective + ‘journey’:

collocations with journey 2

You can download this mind map (imx file) on Biggerplate.

Example sentences from the web with some of these collocations:

  • The train journey, which I’ve taken from Pyongyang to the border, takes about five hours.
  • In the evening, five days after leaving Irkutsk, the train arrived in the Russian-administered city of Harbin. Here my grandfather decided to end his long railway journey.
  • Rebecca was exhausted, jet-lagged, hot, still shaking from the hour-long bumper car journey from the airport.
  • The Yellow River’s epic journey across northern China is a prism through which to see the country’s unfolding water crisis.
  • I traded in my luxury car and briefcase for a pair of walking shoes and a backpack and started a cross-country journey from Times Square.
  • It was the worst possible scenario on the best of all trips: a sentimental journey into the finest elk country in the West.
  • I chose not to call him to wish him a safe journey.
  • In a long, hazardous journey west, G. reached Portugal in mid-1941, and later went to London.
  • Achieving a representative form of government has been a long and tortuous journey, and the search for equity and justice has been an ongoing attempt to find or fashion a world that recognizes and respects all of those who live in it.

Do you know the difference between “to shout to somebody” and “to shout at somebody”?

Difference_between_shout_to_and_shout_at
TO SHOUT AT (somebody) => When you are angry.
TO SHOUT TO (somebody) => When you want  people to hear you.

Example sentences:

  • Look, I am not some college student you can shout at.
  • He shouted to me from the other side of the street.

If you want you can download this mind map as imx file here: Biggerplate.