The TO-INFINITIVE and -ING (part 1)

When one verb is followed by another, we use the -ing form or the infinitive (with or without to. The form of the second verb depends on the first verb ;-).

Let’s learn them!

I hope this post helps you :-). 

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PDF version: verb+ to infinitive

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VERB + TO INFINITIVE

  • (CAN/CAN’T) AFFORD
  • AGREE*
  • AIM
  • APPEAR
  • ARRANGE*
  • ATTEMPT
  • CHOOSE
  • DECIDE*
  • DEMAND*
  • DESERVE
  • FAIL
  • HOPE*
  • LEARN
  • MANAGE
  • NEGLECT
  • OFFER
  • OMIT
  • PLAN
  • PREPARE
  • PRETEND*
  • REFUSE
  • SEEM
  • TEND
  • THREATEN
  • (CAN’T) WAIT
  • WISH

Examples:

  • She can’t afford to lose that vote.
  • They agree to leave at 10:30 am.
  • * They agree (that) they would leave at 10:30 am.
  • We aim to launch next year.
  • Keep me posted on what you decide to do.
  • Your actions threaten to destroy everything we’ve worked for.

verb + object + to infinitive english grammar learning femfy.png

PDF version: verb + object + to infinitive

VERB + OBJECT + TO INFINITIVE

  • ADVISE *
  • ALLOW
  • ENCOURAGE
  • FORBID
  • FORCE
  • INVITE
  • ORDER 
  • PERMIT
  • PERSUADE*
  • REMIND*
  • TEACH*
  • TELL*
  • WARN*

Examples:

  • We would advise you to follow the same path.
  • The Administrative Board invites observers to attend its meetings.
  • We were trying to persuade the witness to testify.

Advise, allow, encourage, forbid and permit can be followed by -ING too when there is no object.

  • I would advise following the same path.
  • We do not allow smoking.

verb + (object) + to infinitive.png

PDF version: verbs + (object) + to infinitive

VERB + (OBJECT) + TO INFINITIVE

  • ASK
  • BEG
  • EXPECT*
  • HELP
  • INTEND
  • PROMISE
  • WANT

Examples:

  • I didn’t ask to work here.
  • I didn’t ask you to work here.
  • She begged him to read the story again.
  • We expect the economy to improve.
  • * We expect (that) the economy will improve.

verb + infinitive (without to)

PDF version: verb + infinitive (without to)

VERB + INFINITIVE (without to)

  • MODAL VERBS: can, could, may, might, must, needn’t, shall, should, will, would.
  • HELP (can be followed by the infinitive with or without to).
  • MAKE and LET (+ OBJECT) are always followed by the infinitive without TO.

Examples:

  • You can borrow my shirt.
  • She might go to Paris.
  • She helped (to) organise the party.
  • Don’t make me add this to the list.
  • After you finish, let the students copy it.

 

 

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Quiz on passive voice

Quiz on conditionals

Conditionals

Zero Conditional - English Grammar - Free English Materials For You.jpg

Example sentences:
– If you heat water, it boils.
– If babies are hungry, they cry.
– There are few jobs for young people if the economy is bad.

First Conditional - English Grammar - Free English Materials For You.jpg

Example sentences:
– If you visit me, I’ll take you to Venice.
– If the weather is fine, we will go on a trip.
– If mum is at home, she’ll make a delicious pizza.

Second Conditional - English Grammar - Free English Materials For You.jpg

Example sentences:
– If Peter had a bike, he would ride it every day.
– If Emily got up early, she would be in time for school.
– Sally wouldn’t buy a car unless she needed it.

Third Conditional - English Grammar - Free English Materials For You.jpg

Example sentences:
– If dad had let me go to the party,  I would have been very happy.
– If I had seen Hellen, I would have given her your message.
– If it had snowed, we would have gone skiing.