Listening activity – “This Farm of the Future Uses No Soil and 95% Less Water”

The following activity is based on a short documentary published on the YouTube channel Stories, and its theme is VERTICAL FARMING as a way to reduce water usage and contamination.

Before watching the video I suggest that you read the vocabulary list, you can also download it (PDF file).

VOCABULARY 

  • LEAFY: having a lot of leaves.
    Plants Flora Foliage Greens Greenery Leafy Leaves
  • HUGE: very large in size, amount o degree.
    Endangered Elephant Trunk Skin Care African Big
  • MASSIVE: very large and heavy.
    Ex. Falkirk Wheelis a massive boat lift in Scotland.
    FalkirkWheelSide_2004_SeanMcClean.jpg
     
  • INDOOR: used, located, done or happening inside a building.
    An indoor field 1024px-Starfire_Sports_Complex_-_indoor_soccer_01
  • NUTRITIOUS: having substances that a person or animal needs to stay healthy and grow properly.
    fruits-and-vegetables-displayed
  • CROP: a plant that is grown by farmers and used as food.
    MaxPixel.freegreatpicture.com-Wheat-Spike-Cereals-Spike-Wheat-Field-Grain-Wheat-8762.jpg
  • TO STACK: to make things into a neat pile.
    Insulated food storage containers are stacked for loading onto Red Cross ERVs and Salvation Army canteens.
    FEMA_-_39207_-_Food_storage_containers_stacked_on_shipping_pallets_in_Texas.jpg
  • ROOT: the part of a plant that grows underground.
    root-276636_1920.jpg
  • TO MIST: to cover something with very small drops of liquid in order to keep it wet.
    Ex. These plants have to be misted regularly.

    Rooting_of_softwood_cuttings_of_elm_under_the_mist_propagation_system.jpg
  • ROW: a line of things or people next to each other.
    seagulls-591437_1280.jpg
  • TREND: a general direction in which a situation is changing or developing.
    Ex. Investments showed a positive trend over the period considered.
     
  • TO FEED (FED/FED): to give food to a person or an animal.
    Bottle_Feeding_Iberian_Lynx_cub_02
  • OVERPOPULATED: with too many people leaving in it.
    514px-TNagar_Ranganathan_Street.JPG
  • TO SPROUT: to appear suddenly and in large numbers.
    Ex. New houses are sprouting everywhere these days. 
  • STEEL: strong metal that can be shaped easily.
    1186px-Steel-Dowel-Pins.jpg 
  • MILL: a factory that produces a particular type of material; a building fitted with machinery for grinding grain into flour.
  • TOUGH: very difficult to deal with; physically and emotionally strong.
    Ex. Karen’s last pregnancy was tough.
  • STRIVE: to try very hard to achieve something.
    Ex. I enjoy watching people strive for their dreams.
  • LANDFILL: a place where waste is buried under the ground.
    120821-F-BP133-050.JPG

PDF version: This Farm of the Future Uses No Soil and 95% Less Water – Vocabulary – Free English Materials For You

Fill in the gaps in the following sentences while listening:

NARRATOR: You can’t see it on the outside, but this old industrial neighborhood is an agricultural oasis. Inside this former laser tag arena, about 250 kinds of ______________ greens are growing in _______________ quantities, to be sold to local supermarkets and restaurants. This is AeroFarms, a massive ______________ vertical farm in Newark, New Jersey. 

DAVID ROSENBERG: Our mission is to build farms in cities all over the world so people have access to ______________, great tasting, highly __________________food.

NARRATOR: ______________ are stacked more than 30 feet high inside this 30,000 square foot space. They’re grown using aeroponic technology.

DAVID ROSENBERG: Typically in indoor growing, the ______________sit in water and one tries to oxygenate the water. Our key inventor realized that if we mist nutrition to the root structure, then the roots have a better oxygenation.

NARRATOR: AeroFarms says the root misting system allows them to use 95% less water than a regular field farm. They also use no pesticides or herbicides. Instead of soil, plants are grown in reusable cloth, made from recycled plastic. And ___________________the sun, there are ______________________of specialized LED lighting.

DAVID ROSENBERG: A lot of people say, sunless? Wait, plants need sun. In fact, the plants don’t need yellow spectrum, so we’re able to reduce our energy footprint by doing things like reducing certain types of spectrum.

NARRATOR: This sophisticated climate controlled system ______________ the growing cycle in half, so crops can be grown all year round, but with a much smaller ______________on the environment.

DAVID ROSENBERG: There are all these stresses on our planet. 70% of our fresh water contamination comes from agriculture. 70% of our fresh water usage goes to agriculture. One third of our arable land has been degraded in the last 40 years. All these macro trends point to the fact that we need a new way to feed our planet.

NARRATOR: One of the early champions of vertical farming is Columbia University ecologist Dickson Despommier. In 1999, Despommier and his students proposed that vertical farms could ___________ ___________________ cities while using less land and less water. They would also cut greenhouse gases by eliminating the need to transport food over long distances. And the idea is finally taking root. Over the past few years, vertical farms have sprouted all over the world, including in Vancouver, Singapore, Panama, the UK, and around the US. Here in Newark, AeroFarms is building out another new farm in a former steel mill, one that’s bigger than a football field. Once it’s fully operational, it’s expected to produce two million pounds of greens a year– all grown vertically.

DAVID ROSENBERG: We listen to the plants very carefully to try and understand what they’re telling us and try and optimize all these different qualities of the plant. It’s a ______________ business, but it’s one that’s going to stay and it’s going to have a bigger and bigger impact.

NARRATOR: Do you think vertical farms will help solve our food production problems?Let us know in the comments below. And check out this next episode to see how this major US city is _________________ to become zero waste.

ROBERT REED: When I started at Recology 23 years ago, the recycling rate was around 38%. Today, we’ve more than __________________that.

NARRATOR: So far, San Francisco has diverted 80% of its waste away from landfills, and its success has been getting global attention.

PDF version (without key): This Farm of the Future Uses No Soil and 95% Less Water – Fill in the gaps
PDF version (KEY): This Farm of the Future Uses No Soil and 95% Less Water – KEY

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HIGHER EDUCATION – Listening activity

This video is hilarious but at the same time, it reveals a view of our times that I find realistic. It is about the amount of money people spend in order to get an education. They feel it is essential because “What kind of job can you get without a proper education, without a degree?”

It is true, in most cases, you will end up unemployed, with a loan to pay out and frustrated. But then, it is up to you. If you are a creative and brilliant person, you will find a way to make a use of the knowledge you acquired, the education you paid for. You cannot find everything on the Internet. I believe the Internet is like an ocean of information, if you do not know how to swim, if you do not know how to row, you will not go far, you will drown.

Higher education gives you a kind of awareness, it gives you the oars which are vital when you know how to use them. At university you learn critical thinking, you have the possibility to meet like-minded people. Chances are, you will also meet teachers that will not be able to arouse your curiosity, arrogant and with narrow minds, or not able to do their jobs. But if you are lucky, you will meet teachers able to guide you. When you become acquainted with these wise individuals, then it will be worth it and it will change your life.

I agree with this man regarding the amount of money we have to pay in order to get an education which I find excessive too. Education should be free, or at least accessible to those deserving it, those willing to commit to studying hard in order to expand their views, to increase their possibilities. 

Then, there is nothing wrong in deciding not to carry on studying after high school, practical jobs are not useless, quite the contrary. We should have the possibility to decide what is the best option for us, depending on our skills, strengths and aims in life.

If you work hard, you like your job and you find it rewarding, you are lucky, not to be judged because you do not have a degree. Being smart has nothing to do with a certificate, with a piece of paper. 

I suggest that you read the vocabulary list before watching the video. 

HIGHER EDUCATION

VOCABULARY

To declare: to say or state (something) in an official or public way.

Innate: a quality you were born with, not one you have learned.

Dependent: decided or controlled by something else — on or upon.

To achieve: to succeed in finishing something or reaching an aim, especially after a lot of work or effort.

Tuition: the act of teaching something, especially to one person or to people in small groups.

Loan: an amount of money that is given to someone for a period of time with a promise that it will be paid back.

To afford: to be able to buy or do something because you have enough money or time.

Purveyor: a person or business that sells or provides something.

Wisdom: knowledge that is gained by having many experiences in life.

Elder: used to refer to the older of two people (such as a father and son) who have the same name; a person who has authority because of age and experience.

Sage: someone, especially an old man, who is very wise.

To set apart: (phrasal verb, separable) to be a quality that makes (someone or something) better than or different from other people or things — usuallyfrom.

Buggy: a light carriage pulled by a horse. buggy-2027141_1280.png

Hire: to employ someone; to give work or a job to (someone) in exchange for wages or a salary.

Entrepreneur: someone who starts a new business and is willing to risk loss in order to make money.

To let go:  to make someone leave their job.

To lack: to not have something that you need, or not have enough of it.

Prospects: chances of future success.

Interactive fill in the gaps exercise:

https://www.onlineexambuilder.com/verb-tenses-fill-in-the-gaps-exercise/exam-166046

Downloadable PDF (with answers): HIGHER EDUCATION – fill in the gaps exercise

Listening activity – Irish (Advanced) – C1

INTERMISSION (2003)

Fill in the gaps in the following sentences

  1. I want you to stay out of ____________________.
  2. I mean, he _________________ me, ma, breaks my heart …
  3. I saw her kissing some _________________
  4. So we hold the _________________ hostage, _________________ our identity.
  5. But _________________, man, it’s not about the money.
  6. And I wouldn’t recommend you get _________________, either.
  7. You and me. _____________ to ____________.
  8. Get ___________ of that old Ronnie you’re cultivating.
  9. Have I got a _________________ like?
  10. Step on the _________________ so I can climb back.

FIVE MINUTES OF HEAVEN (2009)

Fill in the gaps in the following sentences

  1.  I was 15 when I _________________ the UVF, the Ulster Volunteer Force.
  2. At that time there were _________ on the street, every week _________ bombs every day.
  3. And it was like we were under _________.
  4. You have to understand the ____________________.
  5. This is about men who have ___________________ the men they have ___________________ that you have become or something I don’t know.
  6. We want you to meet the man who ____________ your brother, face to face.
  7. He’s always there in my ___________ and I don’t know where to go.
  8. This is the question we all _____________________ the answer to. Truth and reconciliation.
  9. What’s at ___________? Is it possible?
  10. “Time will ___________, they say.” But the years just get heavier.
  11. The man shot my brother ___________ times in the head. The man is having the life of Riley.
  12. Do I _______________ his hand or do I kill him?

THE MIGHTY CELT (2005)

Fill in the gaps in the following sentences

  1. Do you wanna a ___________?
  2. What about this one Joe? He will be a champion. And he’s got ___________
  3. If I ___________ him to win, can I keep him?
  4. It’s like a __________________, get on.
  5. Don’t tell me … You asked her to get ______________________?

PDF version: Listening activity – Trailers – Irish – Advanced – femfy

Answers: Listening activity – Trailers – Answers – femfy

The psychology of Game of Thrones | StarTalk – Listening comprehension

This is a short video (3.10 minutes) realised by The National Geographic “The psychology of Game of Thrones”. On this video, the psychologist Travis Langley discusses how Game of Thrones affects the mind. I suggest that you read the vocabulary list before watching the video. Watch it a first time, then read the sentences in the exercise. After that, watch the video a second time and try to fill in the gaps. You can find a free PDF version with answers below.

Vocabulary

  • Warrior: a person who fights in battle or war., known for having courage, a great vigour and skills. 
  • To cope with something: to manage, to deal successfully with or handle a situation.
    Ex. The book is about coping with stress.

  • To shut down: to cause (an opponent) to be unsuccessful, unable to score; to close temporarily; to stop operating.
    Ex. There’s no way to shut down the simulation.
     
  • Injury: harm or damage.
    Ex. John couldn’t compete in the race because he had an injury.

  • Revenge: the act of doing something to hurt someone because that person did something that hurt you; to take vengeance for.
    Ex. Nothing good ever came from seeking revenge.
     
  • Recurring: happening many times, or happening again.
    Ex. This has been my recurring dream for the last 50 years.
     
  • To restore: to bring back a situation or feeling that existed before.
    Ex. The order was restored after the riots.

Fill in the gaps in the following sentences

  1. Travis: I am a psychology professor, a big __________, and I love using fiction to talk about real psychology.

  2. Neil: So what’s the takeaway from all this violence in the minds of who’s ____________________ audience?

  3. Travis: We know that in experiments that watching violence produces short-term effects on someone’s __________________.

  4. Travis: That’s interesting because if you could __________________, that would be an amazing advance in our understanding of the psychological state of  ________________.

  5. Travis: There are people who, as a form of _______________ with horrible situations, do shut ___________ parts of themselves.

  6. Neil: Tell me about the psychology of __________________.

  7. Travis: And when we feel __________________, when something horrible has happened that made us feel helpless, it’s hard to maintain a sense of _________________ strong.

  8. Travis: And I always said I really think “Game of Thrones” is so popular because of the psychology of the __________________. It’s not about the dragons, the White __________________, or the magic. It’s about the human ______________.

  9. Travis: They hadn’t  ________________ dragons in a long time. For most of them, they’re __________________ about dragons–the                               of dragons.

  10. Neil: Thank you for sharing your psychological __________________.

Downloadable PDF version (with answers): the-psychology-of-game-of-thrones-startalk-listening-comprehension-free-english-materials-for-you

 

Listening comprehension – Overpopulation – The Human Explosion Explained Video by Kurzgesagt

As always, I suggest that you read the vocabulary list before watching the video. You can find a pdf version of this listening comprehension below.

VOCABULARY

  • To skyrocket: to rise extremely quickly or make extremely quick progress towards success.
    Ex. Lipstick sales in South Korea have skyrocketed this year.
  • Fourfold: four times as big or as much.
    Ex. According to recent figures, 34000 people are infected, and the most aggressive form of the virus, HIV 1, which was unknown in the country until the 1990s, has increased fourfold in the past 13 years. 
  • Slums: a poor and crowded area of a city where the buildings are in bad condition.kibera_slum_railway_tracks_nairobi_kenya_july_2012
  • Pollution: the process of making air, water, soil etc dangerously dirty and not suitable for people to use, or the state of being dangerously dirty.
    pollution_in_maracaibo_lake                       alfedpalmersmokestacks
  • To sustain: to provide what is needed for (something or someone) in order to live, to exist, to continue, etc.
    Ex. She wasn’t capable of sustaining close relationships with men. 
  • Ungrounded: not based on facts.
    Ex. The socioeconomic exclusion of women, based on ungrounded discriminatory social definitions of female and male roles, affects not only women and their human rights but also the development of sustainable economies and the protection of the natural environment. 
  • Unprecedented: never having happened before, or never having happened so much.
    We are confronted by an unprecedented situation. 
  • To overrun: to enter quickly and be present in (a place) in large numbers and unwanted.
    Ex. The enemies overran the city last night.overran.jpg

 

  • Worse off: having less money or being in a more difficult situation.
    Ex. The rent increases will leave us worse off. 
  • Sanitation: the systems for taking dirty water and other waste products away from buildings in order to protect people’s health.
    Ex. A lack of clean water and sanitation were the main problems. 
  • Goods: things that are produced to be sold. 
  • Widely: to a large degree; a lot; by a large number of people; in or to many places.
    Ex. Taking notes while listening to a lecture is an important strategy that students use widely for increasing attention and retaining content. 
  • Flourished: to grow or develop well.
    Ex. The Etruscans had flourished from the seventh to the first century B.C. 
  • Emancipation: the process of giving people social or political freedom and rights.
    Ex. Religious fundamentalisms have had a tremendous negative influence on the processes of women’s emancipation. 
  • Supply: the amount of something that is available to be used.
    We have a good and lasting supply of fresh water. 
  • To lead: to show someone where to go, usually by taking them to a place; to be in control of a group, country, or situation.
    Ex. Simplicity can lead to greatness and the concentration of one’s powers. 
  • To drop: if a level or amount drops, it becomes less.
    Ex. Temperatures will drop tomorrow after another scorching day. 
  • Spike: a sudden, rapid increase in something.
    Ex. Public Health officials in the region warned schools about a spike in flu viruses. 
  • To overlook: to see something wrong or bad but decide to ignore it.
    Ex. I don’t want to overlook any opportunity. 
  • To catch up: to do something that should have been done before.
    Ex. New Member States will have a unique possibility to catch up really fast and sometimes to avoid some of our previous mistakes. 
  • From scratch: from a point at which nothing has been done yet.
    Ex. Actually, maybe we should start again from scratch.

Answer the following questions:

  • How many people were living on Earth in 1940?
  • When was the legend of overpopulation born? 
  • What is the demographic transition? 
  • When did the first stage of the demographic transition occur? What happened in this century? 
  • What were the main features of the industrial revolution?
  • What were the main features of the second stage of the demographic transitions? 
  • What about the third stage? 
  • What is the average of children per family today?
  • How many years did it take developed countries to reduce fertility from more than 6 children to less than 3? What about Bangladesh?

PDF version with answers: overpopulation-the-human-explosion-explained-free-english-materials-for-you

 

Listening Activity – Halloween History

Happy Halloween! pumpking halloween.png

Yesterday I watched this interesting video by National Geographic on Halloween so I decided to share it with you. As always you’ll find a vocabulary list below and a comprehension activity. I hope you’ll enjoy it :-).

VOCABULARY

COMMUNION (with somebody/something): the state of sharing or exchanging thoughts and feelings; the feeling of being part of something.
Ex. Many people who live in close communion with nature are superstitious.

PRANK:  a trick that is done to someone usually as a joke.
Ex. Jackie’s pranks were starting to annoy her colleagues.

PATCHWORK: a thing that is made up of many different pieces or parts.
Ex. So the world is this complex patchwork of regions.

OCCULT: magic or supernatural.

TO STITCH WITH:  to make (something) out of many different things
Ex. They stitched red and blue ribbons onto their hats.

TO SPAN: to last for a particular period of time, especially a long period.
Ex. His career spanned half a century.

TO SPREAD: to cover, or to make something cover, a larger and larger area.
Ex. The European flu continues to spread throughout the UK.

VEIL: something that covers or hides something else.

TO GATHER:  to bring (things or people) together into a group.
Ex. The children gathered their toys (together) and put them away.

TO FROWN ON SOMEBODY/SOMETHING: to disapprove of somebody/something.
Ex. The company frowns on dating among employees.

TO MERGE:  to combine or make two or more things combine to form a single thing.
Ex. He has plans to merge his own company with another one.

DECEASED: dead; no longer living.

THE FOLD: a group of people with whom you feel you belong or who share the same ideas or beliefs.
Ex. We are hoping that these policies will bring reluctant voters back to the fold.

FAMINE: a situation in which many people do not have enough food to eat.

EXTORTION: the crime of making somebody give you something by threatening them.

BRIBE: something valuable (such as money) that is given in order to get someone to do something.

Free PDF version: listening-activity-Halloween-vocabulary

Watch the video, then try to answer these questions

1. Who originated Halloween traditions? What did they celebrate on October 31st?

2. Why did they lit huge bonfires and gathered around them?

3. When did the Vatican decide to merge this holiday with a church holiday?

4. All Saints day was known as …

5. What does ‘hallow’ mean?

6. When did Halloween become a ‘dangerous holiday’?

7. What was originally ‘trick or treat’?

Free PDF version: Listening-Activity-Halloween-questions

Answers: Listening-Activity-Halloween-answers

 

Comprehension : Maggie Simpson in “The Longest Daycare”

Maggie Simpson in “The Longest Daycare” 

VOCABULARY

BOW:    bow.png

DAYCARE: a place, program, or organization that takes care of children or sick adults during the day usually while their family members are at work.

SCREENING: the testing or examining of a large number of people or things for disease, faults, etc.

PROBING: to ask a lot of questions in order to find secret or hidden information about someone or something.

LOUSE (Plural => LICE): a type of small insect that lives on the bodies of people or animals.

CHILD SEAT: sense-of-touch-clipart-clipart-panda-free-clipart-images-y0mofy-clipart.png

TODDLER: a child who has only recently learnt to walk.

Watch the video then answer the following questions:

  1. Before entering, Maggie tried to catch:
    – a ladybug
    – a butterfly
    – a dragonfly
  2. Marge has left Maggie at the daycare. How was she feeling in that moment:
    – scared
    – happy
    – bored
  3. What did Maggie leave in the box?
    – a ball, a set of keys, and a pacifier.
    – a set of keys, a doll, and a pencil.
    – a set of keys, a pacifier, and a blue bow.
  4. Did Maggie end up in the gifted area?
    – Yes, she did.
    – No, she didn’t.
  5. Maggie tried to get some paints, what colours did she get?
    – yellow and black
    – brown and white
    – grey and black
  6. Another toddler scared her. He was hitting butterflies with
    – a box
    – a hammer
    – his hand
  7. Maggie tried to save:
    – a warm
    – a snake
    – a caterpillar
  8. The scary child was chasing Maggie. What did stop him at first?
    – a teacher
    – a toy train
    – an animal
  9. What did Maggie try to do right after that?
    – to use the telephone
    – to hide from the scary child
    – to hit the other child
  10. In the room full of children on their walkers, what did Maggy break?
    – a window
    – a balloon
    – a vase
  11. Who was playing the drums?
    – a child
    – a bear
    – a monkey
  12. How did Maggie manage to save the butterfly?
    – she put the butterfly in her pocket
    – she swapped the butterfly with her blue bow.
    – she threw the butterfly out of the window

PDF version: maggie-simpson-in-the-longest-daycare-comprehension-free-english-materials-for-you

Answers: maggie-simpson-in-the-longest-daycare-answers