8 Practical ways to help refugees – Reading comprehension

An interesting article on how to help refugees by Melissa Fleming and published on IDEAS.TED.COM . Are you doing something in order to help refugees? If you have other ideas, share them in the comments below.

I’m teaching them Italian 
https://www.facebook.com/113824145324888/photos/pcb.1337847106255913/1337846886255935/?type=3&theater
and I hope I’ll be able to help them in this way. I find it both rewarding and informative. It’s fascinating getting to know them and their stories, helping them integrating with locals.

Here a vocabulary list for making it easier for you to read the article 8 practical ways to help refugees:

  • To show up: to arrive where you have arranged to meet somebody or do something. 
  • To take notice: to give attention to something. 
  • Steadily: happening or developing in a continuous and usually gradual way. 
  • Drifted: moved slowly, especially as a result of outside forces, with no control over direction. 
  • Stranded: left in a place without a way of leaving. 
  • To thrive: to flourish; to become, and continue to be, successful, strong, healthy, etc.

  • To exacerbate: to make something worse. 
  • Shunned: to ignore someone and not speak to that person because you cannot accept their behaviour, beliefs, etc. 
  • To exploit: to treat a person or situation as an opportunity to gain an advantage for yourself. 
  • Outpouring: an expression of strong feeling that is difficult to control. 
  • To enrol: to arrange for yourself or for somebody else to officially join a course, school, etc. 
  • Raffle: an activity in which people buy tickets with different numbers, some of which are later chosen to win prizes, that is organised in order to make money for a good social purpose.

Read the article, then try to answer the questions below it:

Melissa Fleming of the UN’s Refugee Agency shares some ways to help refugees right now.

When a million refugees showed up in Europe this past year, the world began to take notice of a problem that has been steadily growing before our eyes. Ten years ago, 38 million people had been driven from their homes because of war or persecution; right now that number stands at over 65 million. That’s equivalent to the population of France … drifting, stranded, with little hope of returning home, and few chances to thrive in neighboring countries.

In Europe, the lack of a unified system to manage the influx of refugees and migrants is exacerbating the problem. People are either welcomed or shunned. They can face fences of barbed wire or cheer locals. Around 50,000 people are stranded in Greece, waiting to be relocated to other European countries or sent back home.

On the streets of European cities, I have seen both remarkable generosity and irrational fear. People carry signs with the slogan “Refugees Welcome”; others set asylum homes on fire. While many push for values of tolerance and openness, others are full of fear, afraid of the arrival of so many people from a different continent, with different religions and cultures. Opportunistic right-wing politicians exploit these fears to make gains in elections.

People often ask me what they can do to help. It’s certainly possible to do small, practical but meaningful things to combat the feeling of helplessness that can all too easily become paralyzing. Already, I’ve been struck by the overwhelming outpouring of meaningful acts of kindness by individuals, local charities, religious groups and students who have made their way to borders and train stations to help arriving refugees and migrants (check out the inspiring work done by a team on Lesbos to coordinate efforts to greet the 5,000 refugees arriving on the Greek island every day). Their message is clear: they stand for a Europe that offers refuge to victims of war and compassion for those who are seeking a better life.

Click here to keep reading the article: http://ideas.ted.com/8-practical-ways-to-help-refugees/

Answer the following questions:

  1. A decade ago, 38 million people had been forced to leave their homes, for what reasons?
  2. Is Europe having issues in managing refugees and migrants?
  3. Why are some people scared of refugees?
  4. What are the 8 possible ways to help refugees suggested by Melissa Fleming?
  5. Where did the refugees Welcome Initiative start?
  6. How many entrepreneurs started a catering company with refugees chef in France?
  7. Someone started a football team for refugees and migrants, in what country?
  8. What did the What Design Can Do Refugee Challenge do?
  9. What’s doing the organisation United Invitations?
  10. What Universities offered funds and scholarships to refugees worldwide?
  11. Do you have other ideas for helping refugees? 

 

 

 

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Get rid of

to-get-rid-of-meaning-phrasal-verb-femfy-free-english-materials-for-you

‘Get rid of’ is an INSEPARABLE phrasal verb.

Example sentences:

  • She’s trying to get rid of us.
  • I can’t get rid of my phone until John calls.
  • I just can’t bring myself to get rid of this old dress because it has so many good memories attached to it.

 

 

Tie the knot – English idiom

tie the knot meaning - idiom- vocabulary - getting married Free English Materials For You - femfy.jpg

Example sentences from the web:

  • A: When do you plan to tie the knot?
    B: Let me find a boyfriend first!
  • So when are you two going to tie the knot?
  • The girl I’m going to marry lives in Mauritius and she’ll have her own ideas about where she wants to tie the knot.

If you are curious about the origin of this idiom, check this: Tie the knot – Origin

“Tie the knot” in the news:

Just married! Ciara and Russell Wilson share first picture after fairy tale wedding in British castle with guests including Jennifer Hudson and Kelly Rowland 

Ciara and Russell Wilson are officially married.

The happy couple tied the knot in front of their closest friends and family – including Jennifer Hudson and Kelly Rowland – on Wednesday at a fairy tale castle in Cheshire. 

The bride wore a custom Roberto Cavalli gown as she exchanged vows with the Seattle Seahawks player at the UK’s stunning Peckforton Castle in front of their celeb pals. 

Source: Mail Online

Alabama quarterback Blake Barnett set to tie the knot

Source: Sporting News

 

English4Gamers – Episode 11 – Donkey Kong Country

The 11th episode of English4Gamers is out! In this episode, we keep playing Donkey Kong Country (1994), a platforming video game. As always, I suggest that you read the vocabulary list before watching the episode. There is also a fill in the gaps exercise (with downloadable version and answers) to test your listening comprehension.

VOCABULARY LIST - episode 11 - English4Gamers - Free English Materials For You - Donkey Kong Country.jpg

  • NEMESIS: an opponent or enemy that is very difficult to defeat.
    Ex. 
    The superhero fought her nemesis for years.
  • SCATTERED: placed or found far apart.
    Ex.
     The toys were scattered all over the room.
  • PRECISE: exact and accurate.
    Ex. 
    Thanks to Marilyn’s precise directions, Louis and Natalie found the house without any problems.
  • HUGE: very large; very great in size, amount, or degree.
    Ex. 
    They live in a huge house.
  • TRICKY: difficult to deal with.
    Ex. 
    It’s tricky to learn  to ride a skateboard, but you never forget how.
  • SEVERAL: more than two but not very many.
    Ex. 
    He arrived several hours ago.
  • TO RETRIEVE: to find and bring back something.
    Ex. 
    Linda hoped she would be able to retrieve her files after her computer crashed.

Downloadable PDF version: English4Gamers – Episode 11 – Donkey Kong Country – Vocabulary

Fill in the gaps in the following sentences with the correct words from the box

Box - words (9)

  1. R: You will find ___________________, octopuses, and normal fish.

  2. A: I’ve___________________a secret passage.

  3. R: There is the ___________________ under that rock.

  4. R: You can still ___________________ him… follow him.

  5. R: With the ___________________ button you attack with your ___________________ .

  6. R: So, this is the last level before the ___________________.

  7. A: I really don’t like these jumping ___________________.

  8. A: They’re ___________________ everywhere.

  9. R: You can die many times if you want to, but it’s good because this is a very hard game so … It’s ___________________.

  10. A: Do I have to ___________________ the boss?!?

  11. R: Often the boss is a bigger version of a normal enemy … So … Like a ___________________ crocodile, a huge shark.

  12. R: You see … Every time you ___________________ on him, he gets faster and faster.

Downloadable PDF version: English4Gamers -Episode 11 – Donkey Kong Country – Fill in the gaps

Downloadable PDF version (answers): English4Gamers – Episode 11 – Donkey Kong Country – Answers

 

HAPPY THANKSGIVING!!!

Do you know the origin of this celebration? If you don’t, watch this video and find out more about this topic!

VOCABULARY

TO WONDER = to have an interest in knowing or learning something; to think about something with curiosity.
TO MIND YOUR OWN BUSINESS => This phrase is used as an INFORMAL and often somewhat IMPOLITE way to tell someone to stop watching or asking about something that is private.
BEHOLD! (interjection)= look!; see!
TO BUMP= to collide with; to hit against an object in a sudden and forceful way.
Bump

WHATEVER (slang)
PILGRIM= a person who makes a journey, often a long and difficult one, to a special place for religious reasons.

pilgrims.jpg

Photo credit: Peter E. Lee / Foter.com / CC BY-NC

SETTLEMENT= a place where people have come to live and where few or no people lived before.
FARMER= a person who operates a farm or cultivates a land.

farmer

 Photo credit: jaci XIII / Foter.com / CC BY-NC-SA

HARVEST= the season when crops are gathered from the fields or the activity of gathering crops.

harvest.jpg

 Photo credit: TumblingRun / Foter.com / CC BY-ND

BLESSING= approval that allows or helps you to do something.

Thanksgiving crossword puzzle
(printable or interactive)