Get along

to-get-along-meaning-phrasal-verb-femfy-free-english-materials-for-you

More example sentences:

  • I don’t get along with Sebastian, we have nothing in common!
  • The reason you don’t get along is because you have different values.
  • I like her so much! We are getting along well.

Another meaning of ‘TO GET ALONG’ is ‘to manage’, ‘to cope’, ‘to make progress while doing something’.

Example sentences:

  • I’m not getting along well with my schoolwork. I need to work harder.
  • How are you getting along with your work?
  • I just can’t get along without a secretary.

SYNONYMS:

to-get-along-synonyms

Source

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Burning Millions’ Worth of Illegal Ivory

I suggest that you read the vocabulary list before watching the video ;-):

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VOCABULARY

TUSK => a very long, large tooth that sticks out of the mouth of an animal (such as an elephant, walrus, or boar)

tusk.jpg
TO GO UP IN SMOKE => to burn up completely

to go up in smoke meaning.jpg

Image source

STOCKPILE => a large supply of something that is kept for future use

stockpile meaning.jpg
TO TORCH => to set fire to (something, such as a building) deliberately : to cause (something) to burn
TRADE => the activity or process of buying, selling, or exchanging goods or services
STUNT => something that is done to get attention or publicity
TO BAN => to forbid, to prohibit; to say that something cannot be used or done
TO POACH => to hunt or fish illegally

“Awful” – What does it mean?

meaning of awful - English Vocabulary - Free English Materials For You.jpg

Image source

More example sentences from the web:

  • I feel like something awful will happen.

  • I’m an awful person and a really awful doctor.

  • They heard an awful sound.

Visual thesaurus of this term:

visual thesaurus - synonyms of awful

Image source

awful example sentence.jpg

Image source

“Awful” in the news: 

Saskatchewan man feels awful about historic bridge he set on fire

A song containing this term: Awful – Never Shout Never 

One, two, three, four
It’s an awful way to feel,
You feel so low like you can’t go on
But don’t you fear my dear,
You’re the only thing that keeps me feeling
Anything at all
Close your eyes and ease your troubled mind
Ah ah ah ah
Sometimes in the middle of the night
I wake up and roll out of bed
And wonder why I even woke up in the first place
It’s so awful
Then to make the matters even worse
I swear my love I have a curse
I can’t do anything quite right
I swear I’m trying
It’s so awful
I’m awfully awful
Today
It’s a complex sort of thing
The type of thing that I don’t like to
Sing with all my heart
Emotions fade the nightmares start
And I can’t waste my time
I close my eyes and ease my troubled mind
Ah ah ah ah
Sometimes in the middle of the night
I wake up and roll out of bed
And wonder why I even woke up in the first place
It’s so awful
Then to make the matters even worse
I swear my love I have a curse
I can’t do anything quite right
I swear I’m trying
It’s so awful
I’m awfully awfully awful
Today

I’m waking up for the first time
Since I lost track of my ways
I took my last pill last night
I’m waking up for the first time
The last time
Ah ah ah ah

Sometimes in the middle of the night
I wake up and roll out of bed
And wonder why I even woke up in the first place
It’s so awful
Then to make the matters even worse
I swear my love I have a curse
I can’t do anything quite right
I swear I’m trying
It’s so awful
I’m awfully awfully awfully awful
Today

“To drop the ball” – English idiom

To drop the ball.jpg

More example sentences from the web:

  • You can’t trust Monica to do the job right. She‘s always dropping the ball.

  • Honey, I totally dropped the ball on Chuck’s present to Sarah.

  • Every time I depend on you, you drop the ball.

drop the ball synonyms

Visual Thesaurus

A brief history of video games (part 1) – Safwat Saleem – video + fill in the gaps exercise

VOCABULARY

  • Interface: a system that is used for operating a computer.

  • To spread: to become known by many people.
    Ex. The news spread quickly.

  • Patent: an official document that gives a person or computer the right to be the only one that makes or sells a product for a certain period of time.

  • Mouthful (US): something said that has a lot of meaning or importance.

  • To wonder: to want to know something or to try to understand the reason for something.
    Ex. I wonder if she’ll call him.

  • Release: the act of making something available to the public.
    Ex. The release of her article for publication is scheduled for tomorrow.

  • Hit: success
    Ex. The song is a hit.

  • To heat up: to increase or become more active or intense.

  • To feature: to include someone or something as an important part.
    Ex. I consider the measures featured in the report to be insufficient.

  • To kick off: to begin, to get started.
    Ex. The game kicks off at 2:00.

  • Milestone: an important event in the development or history of something or in someone’s life.
    Ex. Your poem will be a milestone in the literature of your Country.

  • Damsel in distress (old-fashioned): a young woman who is not married and needs to be rescued.

  • Sales: the number of items sold.

  • Merely: only, just.
    Ex. It was merely a suggestion.

Downloadable PDF file: A brief history of videogames (part 1) – Vocabulary

Here you can watch this video with subtitles: Ted Ed

Fill in the gaps in the following sentences with the correct form of the words from the vocabulary list written above:

  1. In 1972, Bear’s idea to get video games out of the science lab and into the living room led to the _____________ of a game console called Odyssey.

  2. A video game is an electronic game that has an ______________ designed for human interaction on a video device.

  3. Space Invaders also helped ____________ what is known as the Golden Age of Arcade Games.

  4. In fact, the earliest U.S. video game ______________ on record was in 1948, and at the time it was referred to as a cathode-ray tube amusement device. That’s a ______________ !

  5. This all changed when a man named Ralph Baer looked at his television screen and ______________ how else it might be used.

  6. By 1978, competition between Atari and another game company called Midway was _______________.

  7. While arcade games continued to decline in ________________ over the years, the popularity of video games was ________________ beginning […].

  8. By 1980, color came to arcade games, and this was also the year that another video gaming _________________ was born.

  9. It was an immediate ___________________ and it’s credited as the first commercially successful video game.

  10. Video games are used by scientists, the military, and people like you, and their evolution has ________________ across arcades, consoles, computers, smartphones, and all kind of other electronics.

  11. It was released in 1987 and, like Donkey Kong, it ___________________ a _______________________ storyline, a storyline common in many video games.

Downloadable PDF file: A brief history of videogames (part 1) – Fill in the gaps exercise with answers

Answers: 

1) Release; 2) interface; 3) kick off; 4) patent; mouthful; 5) wondered; 6) heating up; 7) sales; merely; 8) milestone; 9) hit; 10) spread; 11) featured; damsel in distress.

 

“Stranger in Brașov”- Video with quiz

VOCABULARY:

Lonesome, lonely: sad from being apart from other people.

To set off: to begin a journey

Cement: a soft gray powder that is mixed with water and other substances to make concrete.cement.jpg

To grin: to smile widely.

Cozy: small, comfortable, and warm.

Crochet throws: crochet throws.jpg

To wolf down: (slang) to eat something very rapidly and in very large pieces.

To slip: to move quietly and cautiously.

Feast: a special meal with large amounts of food and drink.

Profusely: given, produced, or existing in large amounts.

Array: a large number, as of persons or objects.

Sinking: anxious.

To stiffen: to become physically tense.

Hasty: done or made very quickly.

Watch the video and answer the questions below:

1.Where did the story take place?
2. How did the old lady receive her unexpected guest?
3. The protagonist met a little girl, who did she think she was?
4. What did they watch on TV?
5. Why did the old woman slip out?
6. What did the old woman cook?
7. How did they communicate?
8. When did the guest understand that they were not her friend’s relatives?
9. What did she do to get out of that embarrassing situation?
10. What was the mistake?

Answers:

1. It took place in Brașov, in Romania.
2. The old lady received her guest with a big grin (smile).
3. She thought she was her friend’s sister.
4. They watched soap operas on TV.
5. The old woman went out to buy food.
6. She made soup, meat, and polenta.
7. They communicated with gestures.
8. She understood she made a mistake while looking at pictures. There weren’t pictures of her friend!
9. To get out of that situation, she said that she had previously booked a room in a hotel.
10. She mixed up the numbers. The right apartment number was 98. 

A STRANGER IN BRASOV – VOCABULARY

A STRANGER IN BRASOV – VIDEO, QUESTIONS, AND ANSWERS

“The audience” – What does it mean?

The audience Photo credit: open hardware summit / Foter.com / CC BY

More example sentences from the web:

  • The audience always like love stories.
  • The audience cried when Marilyn died.
  • This forum provided a unique opportunity to present information on community colleges to a larger audience of researchers studying educational issues.