“Every cloud has a silver lining” – English proverb

Every cloud has a silver lining

This phrase is often said to people who are feeling down or depressed in an attempt to try and cheer them up.
Here you can read some information on this proverb: Origin of this proverb.

 
Example sentences from the web:
  • Well, I suppose it’s nice to know that every cloud has a silver lining.

  • Interview With Mexican Quake Witness (CNN, 2003):

    HARRIS: Well, actually, then, if that’s the case, this toll of only 23 deaths can — I should say — shouldn’t say only 23 deaths — but 23 deaths is actually quite a low number, considering the fact this could be a lot worse, then.
    PETERS: In fact, Mexican authorities are saying they’re quite amazed that the casualties appear to be so low at this point. They do expect them to rise, but they say — well, I guess every cloud has a silver lining. This may be that for this earthquake because previous earthquakes of this magnitude in Mexico have killed hundreds.
    HARRIS: Well, here’s hoping that silver lining gets even bigger and more pronounced there. Thank you, Gretchen Peters, thank you very much. We appreciate it. Take care. Gretchen Peters of the ” Christian Science Monitor ” talking to us from Mexico City.

  • Don’t forget that every cloud has a silver lining. The sun will shine again.

Words from the example sentences you may not know:

  • TOLLthe extent of loss, damage, suffering, etc., resulting from some action or calamity: The toll was 200 persons dead or missing.
  • CASUALTIES: loss in numerical strength through any cause, as death, wounds, sickness, capture, or desertion.
  • EARTHQUAKE: a shaking of a part of the earth’s surface that often causes great damage

“Tickety-boo” – English slang

Tickety-boo slang

Origin of this expression:
It’s likely that “tickety-boo” comes from the Hindi ṭhīk hai babu, which means ‘it’s all right, sir’.

Everything is tickety-boo – Danny Kaye (from the movie Marry Andrew, 1958):

“Stick to your guns” – English idiom

To stick to your guns

Idiom 1-09 example

Example sentences from the web:

  • You must admire the way she sticks to her guns. She is not easy to persuade.
  • I’ll stick to my guns on this matter. I’m sure I’m right.
  • The people of the community stuck to their guns and marched in protests.

ORIGIN OF THIS IDIOM …

This expression originated at a time when guns were becoming the weapon of choice in warfare.
Stick to your guns” was a command given to sailors manning the guns, on military boats. They were to stay at their posts even when the boat was being attacked by enemies.

Stick to your guns – Bon Jovi

So you want to be a cowboy
Well you know it’s more that just a ride
Guess you got to know the real thing
If you want to know the other side
Ain’t nobody riding shotgun
In this world tonight

And when you spit, you better mean it
You got to make ’em all believe it
If you’re gonna be the one

Stick to your guns
Ain’t nobody gonna hurt you, baby
You can go for the trigger
But only if you have to
Aim from the heart
Some will love and some will curse you, baby,
And you can go to war
But only if you have to
It’s only if you have to

So you want to be the big time
Some people have to drag you down
There’s no living in the backseat
If you’re gonna drive through town
And when you pray for independence
Boy, you better stand your ground

You got to give it all you got now
Or you might get shot down
Fight hard until the battle is won

Stick to your guns
Ain’t nobody gonna hurt you, baby, 
You can go for the trigger
But only if you have to
Aim from the heart
Some will love and some will curse you, baby,
And you can go to war
But only if you have to
But only if you have to

Solo

Well, you know that I been through it
I got the scars to prove it
Fight hard and the Battle is yours

Stick to your guns
Ain’t nobody gonna hurt you, baby
You can go for the trigger
But only if you have to
Aim from the heart
Some will love and some will curse you, baby,
And you can go to war
But only if you have to
It’s only if you have to

But stick to your guns

“My lips are sealed” – English idiom

My lips are sealed

Example sentences from the web:

  • I’m not allowed to tell you about the party as my lips are sealed.
  • Don’t worry, Hanna. I won’t tell anyone your secret. My lips are sealed.
  • I’ve been there myself, so no judgments, and my lips are sealed.

Our Lips Are Sealed – The Go-Go’s (80’s song):

Can you hear them
They talk about us
Telling lies
Well, that’s no surprise

Can you see them
See right through them
They have no shield
No secrets to reveal

It doesn’t matter what they say
In the jealous games people play
Our lips are sealed

There’s a weapon
That we must use
In our defense
Silence reveals

When you look at them
Look right through them
That’s when they’ll disappear
That’s when we’ll be feared

It doesn’t matter what they say
In the jealous games people play
Our lips are sealed

Give no mind to what they say
It doesn’t matter anyway
Our lips are sealed

Hush, my darling
Don’t you cry
Quiet, angel
Forget their lies

Can you hear them
They talk about us
Telling lies
Well, that’s no surprise

Can you see them
See right through them
They have no shield
No secrets to reveal

It doesn’t matter what they say
In the jealous games people play
Our lips are sealed

Pay no mind to what they say
It doesn’t matter anyway
Our lips are sealed
Our lips are sealed
Our lips are sealed

Elanguest YouTube Channel

Elanguest has a fantastic YouTube channel where you can find a variety of videos with subtitles.

For instance, this is a video on English vocabulary (topic: hotel). It is perfect for those who are willing to review their vocabulary before going on holidays abroad. In this video, you can read, see, and hear all the most common words related to this topic:

Another video that could come in handy is on shopping vocabulary:

Elanguest’s videos are not only related to English vocabulary. For example, this one is on Active and Passive forms and their uses in English (Grammar):

The topic of the following video is Present simple/continuous:

“Knackered” – British slang

Knackered

Example sentences from the web:

  • The rider forgot to eat before the last climb of the day and he was completely knackered half way up
  • I helped my parents with house chores today. I’m too knackered to join you for dinner, I’m sorry.
  • She has finished the book. Then she fell asleep immediately, she was so knackered!

“To waffle” – British slang

To waffleImage source

Probably you knew already the common meaning of “waffle” in British and American English. If you didn’t … this is a “waffle”:
waffle

A “waffle” is a type of pancake with a pattern of square dents in it, made in a waffle iron.

According to Random House Dictionary waffle with the British English meaning of talking idly, and foolishly without purpose is derived from waff (which means to bark or to yelp like a dog) and first appeared in print between 1695-1705.

Example sentences from the web:

  • She waffled when asked what she thought of her sister’s new boyfriend.
  • If you don’t know the answer, it’s no good just waffling (on) for pages and pages.

From a British newspaper clipping (1957):
newspaper - to waffle

Image source

Remember that in American slang the meaning of “to waffle” is different.
Example sentences from the web:

  • American voters waffled in 2000.
  • He waffled on an important issue.
    [= to fail to make up one’s mind; to equivocate; to waver; to oscillate between options].

TO END vs TO FINISH – Collocations in English

To_end_vs_to_finishBased on: McCarthy, M. O’Dell, F. (2008), Collocations in use, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

TO END

  • To stop with a clear conclusion. We use it when there’s an important change.
    Example: World War II ended in 1945.
  • END can’t be followed by either the infinitive (to- form) or the -ing form.
    Example: Mark ended drying his hair. => This sentence isn’t correct!
    The correct sentence is: Mark finished drying his hair.

TO FINISH

  • To bring something to an end.
    Example: Are you sure you’ll finish your essay by Monday?
  • To eat, drink the last of something.
    Example: I’m sorry, I just finished the coffee.
  • It can be followed by the -ing form, but not by the infinitive.
    Example: They have finished to play. => This sentence is not correct!
    The correct sentence is: They have finished playing.

Agreeing or disagreeing in English – Second version

Someone asked me to make this mind map with a bigger font size. On my computer, I created it as imx file (you can download it from biggerplate.com).Unfortunately, only with iMindmap you can read imx files and I know that not everyone has it. The only thing I can do with mind maps is to use a screen capture program and post them as images. Unfortunately, when I make big mind maps, with a lot of branches, I can’t use a big font size. Consequently, some people could find it difficult to read them. What I can do for them is to write as a normal post what is written in the mind map. If you have any other suggestion, I always welcome new ideas ;-).

By the way, if you click on the mind map image you have the possibility to zoom a little bit.

Agreeing_or_disagreeing_in_English_002

AGREEING OR DISAGREEING IN ENGLISH

Simple agreement:

  • I agree with you.
  • Tell me about it! (slang)
  • I have to side with you/him/her /them … on this one.
  • I think you are right.
  • Yes, and …
  • That’s exactly how I feel.
  • You have a point there.
  • I accept your point.

Partly agreeing

  • I agree with you in principle, but …
  • That’s quite true, but …
  • I agree with you up to a point, but …

Agreeing strongly

  • You’re absolutely right.
  • I totally agree.
  • I couldn’t agree with you more.
  • I completely agree.
  • I agree entirely.
  • I agree with you 100 percent.
  • That’s so true.

Disagreeing

  • I disagree.
  • I’m not sure I agree with you.
  • I don’t agree.
  • That’s not always the case.
  • Yes, but …
  • I don’t share your opinion.
  • I can’t agree with you.
  • I think we’re going to have to agree to disagree.
  • I beg to differ.
  • That’s not always true.

Disagreeing strongly

  • I don’t agree at all.
  • No way.
  • I couldn’t agree with you less.
  • I totally disagree.
  • I really can’t agree with you there.
  • I’d say the exact opposite.
  • You’ve got to be kidding!
  • You’re dead wrong.
  • You’re way wrong.
  • I can’t find myself to agree with you.

You’ll sound more polite by using a phrase such as “I’m afraid …” or “I’m sorry but …” before disagreeing or disagreeing strongly.