Agreeing or disagreeing in English – Second version

Someone asked me to make this mind map with a bigger font size. On my computer, I created it as imx file (you can download it from biggerplate.com).Unfortunately, only with iMindmap you can read imx files and I know that not everyone has it. The only thing I can do with mind maps is to use a screen capture program and post them as images. Unfortunately, when I make big mind maps, with a lot of branches, I can’t use a big font size. Consequently, some people could find it difficult to read them. What I can do for them is to write as a normal post what is written in the mind map. If you have any other suggestion, I always welcome new ideas ;-).

By the way, if you click on the mind map image you have the possibility to zoom a little bit.

Agreeing_or_disagreeing_in_English_002

AGREEING OR DISAGREEING IN ENGLISH

Simple agreement:

  • I agree with you.
  • Tell me about it! (slang)
  • I have to side with you/him/her /them … on this one.
  • I think you are right.
  • Yes, and …
  • That’s exactly how I feel.
  • You have a point there.
  • I accept your point.

Partly agreeing

  • I agree with you in principle, but …
  • That’s quite true, but …
  • I agree with you up to a point, but …

Agreeing strongly

  • You’re absolutely right.
  • I totally agree.
  • I couldn’t agree with you more.
  • I completely agree.
  • I agree entirely.
  • I agree with you 100 percent.
  • That’s so true.

Disagreeing

  • I disagree.
  • I’m not sure I agree with you.
  • I don’t agree.
  • That’s not always the case.
  • Yes, but …
  • I don’t share your opinion.
  • I can’t agree with you.
  • I think we’re going to have to agree to disagree.
  • I beg to differ.
  • That’s not always true.

Disagreeing strongly

  • I don’t agree at all.
  • No way.
  • I couldn’t agree with you less.
  • I totally disagree.
  • I really can’t agree with you there.
  • I’d say the exact opposite.
  • You’ve got to be kidding!
  • You’re dead wrong.
  • You’re way wrong.
  • I can’t find myself to agree with you.

You’ll sound more polite by using a phrase such as “I’m afraid …” or “I’m sorry but …” before disagreeing or disagreeing strongly.

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