“Tosser” – British slang

Tosser - British Slang Photo credit: Lst1984 / Foter.com / CC BY-NC

Here you can find other examples and meanings of this slang term: Urban Dictionary

“Geek” – English slang

Geek

Geek2

geek-nerd

Image source

*Notice that in British slang the meaning of “geek” is slightly different in a negative way. In the UK, a “geek” is someone into computers and IT, but also a boring and not fashionable person.

Whatever – English slang

Whatever

Example sentences from the web:

  • Boy: I am exhausted today. Looking forward to going home and doing nothing, hopefully, you’re up for the same?
    Girl: Yeah, whatever.
  • Whatever. It’s like you want to get your heart broken again.
  • Whateverjust another reason we made the right decision.

An interesting discussion on this topic: When did “Whatever.” begin to be used as a sentence?

Notice that ‘whatever’ has other meanings. It can be used as an adverb, a conjunction, a determiner, or a pronoun.
As a pronoun it introduces a relative clause and its meaning is: ‘everything‘; ‘anything that‘. For example: Do whatever he asks you to. As an adjective, it means ‘of any kind‘; ‘in any amount‘; ‘no matter what‘. For example, I saw no point whatever in continuing. Furthermore, we use it in questions as a synonym of ‘what’, but with more emphasis.
For example: Whatever do you mean? = What do you mean? ‘Whatever’ is also used as a conjunction. In this case, it connects two clauses: I won’t go there, whatever he says.

“To fancy” – English slang

To fancy someone

Example sentences from the web:

  • The thing is, you marry a woman you fancy.
  • Did you fancy anyone?
  • No, I do not fancy Miss Pattman and I will not have her disrespected in this way.

Notice that in British English “to fancy” means also “to like something”:

If you both fancy the dress, you’ll just have to share and wear it one after the other.

“To waffle” – British slang

To waffleImage source

Probably you knew already the common meaning of “waffle” in British and American English. If you didn’t … this is a “waffle”:
waffle

A “waffle” is a type of pancake with a pattern of square dents in it, made in a waffle iron.

According to Random House Dictionary waffle with the British English meaning of talking idly, and foolishly without purpose is derived from waff (which means to bark or to yelp like a dog) and first appeared in print between 1695-1705.

Example sentences from the web:

  • She waffled when asked what she thought of her sister’s new boyfriend.
  • If you don’t know the answer, it’s no good just waffling (on) for pages and pages.

From a British newspaper clipping (1957):
newspaper - to waffle

Image source

Remember that in American slang the meaning of “to waffle” is different.
Example sentences from the web:

  • American voters waffled in 2000.
  • He waffled on an important issue.
    [= to fail to make up one’s mind; to equivocate; to waver; to oscillate between options].