“To waffle” – British slang

To waffleImage source

Probably you knew already the common meaning of “waffle” in British and American English. If you didn’t … this is a “waffle”:
waffle

A “waffle” is a type of pancake with a pattern of square dents in it, made in a waffle iron.

According to Random House Dictionary waffle with the British English meaning of talking idly, and foolishly without purpose is derived from waff (which means to bark or to yelp like a dog) and first appeared in print between 1695-1705.

Example sentences from the web:

  • She waffled when asked what she thought of her sister’s new boyfriend.
  • If you don’t know the answer, it’s no good just waffling (on) for pages and pages.

From a British newspaper clipping (1957):
newspaper - to waffle

Image source

Remember that in American slang the meaning of “to waffle” is different.
Example sentences from the web:

  • American voters waffled in 2000.
  • He waffled on an important issue.
    [= to fail to make up one’s mind; to equivocate; to waver; to oscillate between options].

TO END vs TO FINISH – Collocations in English

To_end_vs_to_finishBased on: McCarthy, M. O’Dell, F. (2008), Collocations in use, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

TO END

  • To stop with a clear conclusion. We use it when there’s an important change.
    Example: World War II ended in 1945.
  • END can’t be followed by either the infinitive (to- form) or the -ing form.
    Example: Mark ended drying his hair. => This sentence isn’t correct!
    The correct sentence is: Mark finished drying his hair.

TO FINISH

  • To bring something to an end.
    Example: Are you sure you’ll finish your essay by Monday?
  • To eat, drink the last of something.
    Example: I’m sorry, I just finished the coffee.
  • It can be followed by the -ing form, but not by the infinitive.
    Example: They have finished to play. => This sentence is not correct!
    The correct sentence is: They have finished playing.

Agreeing or disagreeing in English – Second version

Someone asked me to make this mind map with a bigger font size. On my computer, I created it as imx file (you can download it from biggerplate.com).Unfortunately, only with iMindmap you can read imx files and I know that not everyone has it. The only thing I can do with mind maps is to use a screen capture program and post them as images. Unfortunately, when I make big mind maps, with a lot of branches, I can’t use a big font size. Consequently, some people could find it difficult to read them. What I can do for them is to write as a normal post what is written in the mind map. If you have any other suggestion, I always welcome new ideas ;-).

By the way, if you click on the mind map image you have the possibility to zoom a little bit.

Agreeing_or_disagreeing_in_English_002

AGREEING OR DISAGREEING IN ENGLISH

Simple agreement:

  • I agree with you.
  • Tell me about it! (slang)
  • I have to side with you/him/her /them … on this one.
  • I think you are right.
  • Yes, and …
  • That’s exactly how I feel.
  • You have a point there.
  • I accept your point.

Partly agreeing

  • I agree with you in principle, but …
  • That’s quite true, but …
  • I agree with you up to a point, but …

Agreeing strongly

  • You’re absolutely right.
  • I totally agree.
  • I couldn’t agree with you more.
  • I completely agree.
  • I agree entirely.
  • I agree with you 100 percent.
  • That’s so true.

Disagreeing

  • I disagree.
  • I’m not sure I agree with you.
  • I don’t agree.
  • That’s not always the case.
  • Yes, but …
  • I don’t share your opinion.
  • I can’t agree with you.
  • I think we’re going to have to agree to disagree.
  • I beg to differ.
  • That’s not always true.

Disagreeing strongly

  • I don’t agree at all.
  • No way.
  • I couldn’t agree with you less.
  • I totally disagree.
  • I really can’t agree with you there.
  • I’d say the exact opposite.
  • You’ve got to be kidding!
  • You’re dead wrong.
  • You’re way wrong.
  • I can’t find myself to agree with you.

You’ll sound more polite by using a phrase such as “I’m afraid …” or “I’m sorry but …” before disagreeing or disagreeing strongly.

Telephone – phrasal verbs

telephone_Phrasal_verbs

Here you can download the imx file: http://www.biggerplate.com/mindmaps/TdstKce8/telephone-phrasal-verbs#

Take the quiz: Phrasal verbs related to a phone call

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