Ways of saying “goodbye” in English

Informal_goodbyes

INFORMAL GOODBYES

  • Bye! => very common way to say goodbye.
  • Bye bye! => it sounds very kiddish (more for kids).
  • Later! => Very friendly and casual way, more for men. Ex. “Later bro!”, “Later man”.
  • See you later / soon => Very casual and relaxed goodbye. It can be used to indicate that you want to or plan to meet with the person again soon. If you use “ya” instead of “you”, this become even more casual.
  • Talk to you later
  • I’ve got to get going / I must be going => This is used in casual situations when you want to escape the conversation quickly and you don’t want to go through a longer or more sentimental goodbye.
  • Take it easy => It’s now less used than in the past. It is casual and it means “take care”.
  • I’m off
  • Have a good one => Similar to “have a nice / good day”, but it sounds really casual.
  • So long! => It’s used in some news headlines, but not so common between people.
  • Alright => Very casual way.

Formal_and_business_goodbyes

FORMAL AND BUSINESS GOODBYES

  • Goodbye!
  • Have a nice day / have a good day! => For example, you buy something in a shop after you have paid the cashier would tell you “Have a nice day”.
  • I look forward to our next meeting
  • Take care! => it is a little formal and you use it with your close relatives and other people you are close too. You might use this in an email or written letter.
  • It was nice to see you again / It was nice seeing you.
  • Good night!  => Notice that “good afternoon”, “good morning” and “good evening” are greeting expressions and you can’t use them to say “goodbye”).
  • Farewell => it is more like a final goodbye. For example, someone is moving abroad and you are not going to see this person again. In this situation, you can use “farewell”.  It is the type of thing that two lovers in a movie might say if they’re never going to see each other again. So, you probably won’t use it often in daily life.

Slang_ways_of_saying_goodbye

SLANG WAYS OF SAYING “GOODBYE”

  • Later / laters / catch you later
  • Peace / peace out => it comes from the hip-hop music culture. It’s more of a hand gesture. It is a very casual way and it means that you wish the other person well.
  • I’m out / I’m out of here => You are really happy about going.
  • I gotta jet / I gotta take off / I gotta hit the road / I gotta head out => these are slang versions of “I have got to get going”. “Gotta” is an abbreviation of “got to”.
  • Catch ya later! => Variation for “See you later”. This is used very casually between friends or acquaintances.
  • Smell you later! => This is something you’ll hear kids say far more than adults! But grown-ups might occasionally be overheard saying this to a friend as a joke too. 

This is a video on this topic:

Mind maps download (imx file) available on Biggerplate.

Advertisements

Agreeing or disagreeing in English – Second version

Someone asked me to make this mind map with a bigger font size. On my computer, I created it as imx file (you can download it from biggerplate.com).Unfortunately, only with iMindmap you can read imx files and I know that not everyone has it. The only thing I can do with mind maps is to use a screen capture program and post them as images. Unfortunately, when I make big mind maps, with a lot of branches, I can’t use a big font size. Consequently, some people could find it difficult to read them. What I can do for them is to write as a normal post what is written in the mind map. If you have any other suggestion, I always welcome new ideas ;-).

By the way, if you click on the mind map image you have the possibility to zoom a little bit.

Agreeing_or_disagreeing_in_English_002

AGREEING OR DISAGREEING IN ENGLISH

Simple agreement:

  • I agree with you.
  • Tell me about it! (slang)
  • I have to side with you/him/her /them … on this one.
  • I think you are right.
  • Yes, and …
  • That’s exactly how I feel.
  • You have a point there.
  • I accept your point.

Partly agreeing

  • I agree with you in principle, but …
  • That’s quite true, but …
  • I agree with you up to a point, but …

Agreeing strongly

  • You’re absolutely right.
  • I totally agree.
  • I couldn’t agree with you more.
  • I completely agree.
  • I agree entirely.
  • I agree with you 100 percent.
  • That’s so true.

Disagreeing

  • I disagree.
  • I’m not sure I agree with you.
  • I don’t agree.
  • That’s not always the case.
  • Yes, but …
  • I don’t share your opinion.
  • I can’t agree with you.
  • I think we’re going to have to agree to disagree.
  • I beg to differ.
  • That’s not always true.

Disagreeing strongly

  • I don’t agree at all.
  • No way.
  • I couldn’t agree with you less.
  • I totally disagree.
  • I really can’t agree with you there.
  • I’d say the exact opposite.
  • You’ve got to be kidding!
  • You’re dead wrong.
  • You’re way wrong.
  • I can’t find myself to agree with you.

You’ll sound more polite by using a phrase such as “I’m afraid …” or “I’m sorry but …” before disagreeing or disagreeing strongly.