Splinter – Vocabulary (Intermediate – Advanced)

Splinter- vocabulary - femfy - Free English Materials For You - FCE - intermediate.png

Example sentences:

  • The splinter already hurts more than pulling it out.
  • They did pull over 50 glass splinters from her hands.
  • I landed on the glass. I’ve got splinters.

To concede – Vocabulary (advanced)

to-concede-meaning-vocabulary-ielts-advanced-c2-c1-fce-femfy-free-english-materials-for-you

Example sentences:

  • Steve had to concede the rival another victory.
  • The company was forced to concede that items of private data had been illegally stored.
  • I don’t concede that I’m being unreasonable for merely trying to be rational about our living arrangement.

Visual thesaurus (source: http://www.visualthesaurus.com)

to-concede-visual-thesaurus-synonyms

In the news:

17-01-2017-03-09-38

Source:  Adam Withnall Gambia election: President Yahya Jammeh in shock defeat to former Argos security guard Adama Barrow, Independent

17-01-2017-03-13-12

Source: Hardik Vyas, Independent

17-01-2017-03-15-25.png

Source:  in Chicago and in Washington, The Guardian

Listening comprehension – Overpopulation – The Human Explosion Explained Video by Kurzgesagt

As always, I suggest that you read the vocabulary list before watching the video. You can find a pdf version of this listening comprehension below.

VOCABULARY

  • To skyrocket: to rise extremely quickly or make extremely quick progress towards success.
    Ex. Lipstick sales in South Korea have skyrocketed this year.
  • Fourfold: four times as big or as much.
    Ex. According to recent figures, 34000 people are infected, and the most aggressive form of the virus, HIV 1, which was unknown in the country until the 1990s, has increased fourfold in the past 13 years. 
  • Slums: a poor and crowded area of a city where the buildings are in bad condition.kibera_slum_railway_tracks_nairobi_kenya_july_2012
  • Pollution: the process of making air, water, soil etc dangerously dirty and not suitable for people to use, or the state of being dangerously dirty.
    pollution_in_maracaibo_lake                       alfedpalmersmokestacks
  • To sustain: to provide what is needed for (something or someone) in order to live, to exist, to continue, etc.
    Ex. She wasn’t capable of sustaining close relationships with men. 
  • Ungrounded: not based on facts.
    Ex. The socioeconomic exclusion of women, based on ungrounded discriminatory social definitions of female and male roles, affects not only women and their human rights but also the development of sustainable economies and the protection of the natural environment. 
  • Unprecedented: never having happened before, or never having happened so much.
    We are confronted by an unprecedented situation. 
  • To overrun: to enter quickly and be present in (a place) in large numbers and unwanted.
    Ex. The enemies overran the city last night.overran.jpg

 

  • Worse off: having less money or being in a more difficult situation.
    Ex. The rent increases will leave us worse off. 
  • Sanitation: the systems for taking dirty water and other waste products away from buildings in order to protect people’s health.
    Ex. A lack of clean water and sanitation were the main problems. 
  • Goods: things that are produced to be sold. 
  • Widely: to a large degree; a lot; by a large number of people; in or to many places.
    Ex. Taking notes while listening to a lecture is an important strategy that students use widely for increasing attention and retaining content. 
  • Flourished: to grow or develop well.
    Ex. The Etruscans had flourished from the seventh to the first century B.C. 
  • Emancipation: the process of giving people social or political freedom and rights.
    Ex. Religious fundamentalisms have had a tremendous negative influence on the processes of women’s emancipation. 
  • Supply: the amount of something that is available to be used.
    We have a good and lasting supply of fresh water. 
  • To lead: to show someone where to go, usually by taking them to a place; to be in control of a group, country, or situation.
    Ex. Simplicity can lead to greatness and the concentration of one’s powers. 
  • To drop: if a level or amount drops, it becomes less.
    Ex. Temperatures will drop tomorrow after another scorching day. 
  • Spike: a sudden, rapid increase in something.
    Ex. Public Health officials in the region warned schools about a spike in flu viruses. 
  • To overlook: to see something wrong or bad but decide to ignore it.
    Ex. I don’t want to overlook any opportunity. 
  • To catch up: to do something that should have been done before.
    Ex. New Member States will have a unique possibility to catch up really fast and sometimes to avoid some of our previous mistakes. 
  • From scratch: from a point at which nothing has been done yet.
    Ex. Actually, maybe we should start again from scratch.

Answer the following questions:

  • How many people were living on Earth in 1940?
  • When was the legend of overpopulation born? 
  • What is the demographic transition? 
  • When did the first stage of the demographic transition occur? What happened in this century? 
  • What were the main features of the industrial revolution?
  • What were the main features of the second stage of the demographic transitions? 
  • What about the third stage? 
  • What is the average of children per family today?
  • How many years did it take developed countries to reduce fertility from more than 6 children to less than 3? What about Bangladesh?

PDF version with answers: overpopulation-the-human-explosion-explained-free-english-materials-for-you

 

Reading comprehension : “Ladakh’s tourism boom is slowly changing the age-old way of life in a corner of the Indian Himalayas” — Quartz

I suggest that you check the vocabulary list before reading the article ;-). If the article is too difficult for you, you can also use Rewordify to read a simpler version of it. 

VOCABULARY

NESTLED: to be located in a position that is protected, sheltered or partly hidden.
Ex. And while the compound, nestled on the remote shores of Lake Nipissing, was his entire world.

DISPOSABLE: made to be used once or only a few times.

INCOME: money that is earned from doing work or received for investments. 

INCREASINGLY: more and more all the time.
Ex. Global warming is an increasingly serious threat.

TO FLOCK: to gather or move together somewhere in large numbers.
Ex. The people that flocked to that motorcycle to help him get a chance of doing the Grand Prix, they saw that he was something special.

PROLIFERATION: to increase a lot and suddenly in number.
Ex. Gun proliferation is a global problem.

PACKAGE TOUR: a group of services related to travel or vacations that are sold together for one price.

FIGURE: a number representing a particular amount, especially one given in official information.

TO FATHOM: to come to understand.
Ex. I thought I had a lifetime to fathom the secrets in your eyes.

WINDSWEPT: not protected from strong winds.

windswept.jpg

TO PERMEATE: to spread to every part of an object or a place.
Ex. The water permeated the sand. 

GREEDY: having or wanting a lot more money, food, etc. than you need.

greedy.jpg

HERDER: a person who take care of a large group of animals of the same type.

herder

SUBSIDY: money that is paid usually by a government to keep the price of a product or service low or to help a business or organization to continue to function.
Ex. The federal government gives us a subsidy for each person that completes the training.

Nestled high up in the Indian Himalayas, Ladakh was first opened up to tourists only in 1974. That year, just 527 visitors made the trip; of these, only 27 were from India. But in recent years, with rising disposable incomes and a growing interest in travel, Indians are increasingly flocking to the region’s high-altitude villages,…

via Ladakh’s tourism boom is slowly changing the age-old way of life in a corner of the Indian Himalayas — Quartz

Read the article, then answer the following questions (write your answers below):

  1. How many Indian tourists visited Ladakh in 1974?
  2. More and more Indian tourists are visiting the Indian Himalayas villages recently. What are the reasons?
  3. What are the consequences of the tourism rapid growth?
  4. What kind of crop is Tashi Pgrowing on her farm?
  5. What’s Tashi’s opinion about the tourism boom?
  6. What’s Phunchok Angmo’s profession? How has this boom affected the population according to her?
  7. What are the benefits of this economic growth?
  8. What’s your opinion?

Listening Activity – Jane Austen

This is a listening activity based on The School of Life’s short video (about 7 minutes long) “LITERATURE – Jane Austen”. This activity is aimed at students who have an English level between B2 and C1 (Upper Intermediate and Advanced).

I suggest that you read the following vocabulary list before watching the video. Under the video, there are two exercises (with answers) and a writing practice suggestion. 

VOCABULARY 

  • AMBITIOUS: having a desire to be successful, powerful, or famous; having ambition.
    Ex. She was ambitious enough to aim for the company’s presidency.
     
  • STERN: very serious; severe.
    Ex. Journalists received a stern warning not to go anywhere near the battleship.
     
  • CONSCIOUS: awake, thinking, and knowing what is happening around you.
    Ex. When I took the exam, I was conscious that my parents were expecting a lot of me.

  • DIGNIFIED: serious and somewhat formal; having or showing dignity.
    Ex. Even when very old, he was very dignified in appearance.

  • WELL OFF: moderately rich.
    Ex. They must be well off if they can afford to buy a house there!
     
  • TEMPTED: to want something or to want to do something.
    Ex. “Would you like some more pie?” “I’m tempted, but no thank you.”

  • STRUGGLE: a long effort to do, achieve, or deal with something that is difficult or that causes problems.
    Ex. The people of this country will continue in their struggle for independence.
     
  • TO CONDEMN: to say in a strong and definite way that someone or something is bad or wrong.
    Ex. We strongly condemn this attack against our allies.
     
  • TO OVERCOME: to prevail over (opposition, a debility, temptations, etc.); surmount.
    Ex. To overcome one’s weaknesses.

  • INCOME: money that is earned from work, investments, business, etc.
    Ex. He has a very high annual income.
     
  • TO FELL APART: to break into pieces (often used figuratively).
    Ex. I feel as if my family is falling apart.
     
  • TO SUPPLY: to furnish or provide (something wanting or requisite).
    Ex. To supply a community with electricity.
     
  • WEALTH: a large amount of money or valuable possessions that someone has.
    Ex. The wealth of a city. 
  • ELUSIVE: hard to find or capture.
    Ex. Police are trying to track down the elusive criminal, who has so far avoided all their attempts to capture him.

  • SNOBBISH: like a snob (a person who respects and likes only people who are of a high social class).
    Ex. He’s a snobbish rich kid.

  • GREED: a selfish desire to have more of something (especially money).
    Ex. He was a ruthless businessman, motivated by naked ambition and greed.

Downloadable PDF version: JANE AUSTEN – Vocabulary

Watch the video and answer the following questions

  1. Austen wanted to change people with her novels. How did she want them to become?
  2. When is Jane Austen born and where?
  3. How was the writer’s family social status?
  4. Did she get married?
  5. What’s Jane’s sister name?
  6. How many novels did Jane complete?
  7. What are the titles of the novels she completed?
  8. What are the four main things Jane Austen wanted to teach us?
  9. In Jane Austen’s opinion marriage depends on two factors, do you remember them?
  10. Name the two mistakes people make around money according to Jane Austen.

Writing practice suggestion

  1. Write Jane Austen’s main opinions concerning love, marriage, judging people, money, and being snobbish. Do you agree or disagree with the writer?
    Justify your answer.

Downloadable PDF version: Jane Austen – Listening comprehension

Downloadable PDF version: Jane Austen – Listening comprehension with answers

Watch the video then fill in the gaps in the following sentences

  1. Jane Austen is loved mainly as a guide to fashionable life in the _____________ period, but her own vision of her task was radically different.
  2. She was an ambitious and ______________ moralist.
  3. Born in _____________, Austen grew up in a small village in Hampshire, where her father was the Anglican _________________.
  4. She did much of her writing at a ______________ octagonal table.
  5. The _______________ was her chosen weapon in the struggle to reform humanity.
  6. ________________ starts of feeling superior because he has more money and higher status.
  7. The story ______________ them because they have developed well.
  8. ______________________________ starts when quiet, shy Fanny Price goes to live with her much richer cousins, the Bertrams.
  9. In Pride and Prejudice, she explains that Mr. _________________ has an income of _________________ pounds a year –that’s rather a lot- while Darcy has more than twice that.
  10. At one point in _______________________________, it looks like Elinor Dashwood and Edward Ferrars who are otherwise well suited won’t be able to get married.
  11. In Emma, the heroine –Emma herself- takes ______________________ -a pretty girl from the village- under her wing.

Downloadable PDF version: Jane Austen – Fill in the gaps exercise

Downloadable PDF version: Jane Austen – Fill in the gaps exercise answers

 

Helena Christensen & Portrait Photographer Mary Ellen Mark Capture™ – Episode 7 LISTENING ACTIVITY

I suggest that you read the vocabulary list below before watching the video.

VOCABULARY

 

Hitch – hiking: to get a ride in a passing vehicle by holding out your arm with your thumb up as you stand on the side of the road.hitchhiking.gif


Scope:
the area or amount covered, reached, or viewed.
Ex. Romance questions are beyond the scope of the language forum.

Standstill: a condition in which all movement or activity has stopped.
Ex. This is an emergency, but the negotiations are at a virtual standstill.

Creepy:   strange or scary : causing people to feel nervous and afraid.
Ex. This is the creepy stalker woman from the surveillance video.

 To broom: to sweep the floor with a broom.

to broom meaning.jpg

To kick in: to start to have an effect or to happen.
Ex. The effects of the tranquilizer should begin to kick in within a few minutes.

Harsh: cruel or unkind.
Ex. She was quite harsh with the kids. She should be nicer to them.

Guarded: very careful about giving information, showing feelings, etc.

Vocal: expressing opinions and complaints in a public and forceful way.
Ex. Residents became vocal in their opposition to the plan.

To blow up: to make a photographic enlargement of.

Dull: boring, not exciting or interesting.

To tear up: to damage, remove, or effect an opening in.

Mind-blowing: extremely exciting or surprising.
Ex. The special effects in this film are pretty mind-blowing.

Goosebumps: small bumps on your skin that are caused by cold, fear, or a sudden feeling of excitement.

Downloadable PDF file: Helena Christensen & Portrait Photographer Mary Ellen Mark Capture™ Ep. 7 – VOCABULARY

Fill in the gaps in the following sentences:

  1. Helena Christensen: I ____________________ around the world when I was about 18-19 years old and I think my interest and passion for photography probably started on that trip. And then almost immediately that trip ended my _______________ _________________ started and so then I got to see the world.
  2. Voice-over: I’ve had the rare opportunity to meet many amazing photographers who moved through the different _________________ to create powerful images.
  3. Mark Seliger: I’m here with Mary Ellen Mark photojournalist and portrait photographer ___________ work has changed, I think, the _________ of modern photography.
  4. Mark Seliger: It was very ________________ to me because there was photojournalism but there was also this very ____________ and creative way that images were presented.
  5. Mary Ellen Mark: Magazines were like ______________ for me, they gave me this amazing opportunity to do my own work.
  6. Helena Christensen: When I’m behind the camera I seem to stop breathing because I get so ______________ by the moment. It’s almost like everything just came to a standstill.
  7. Mary Ellen Mark: The guy that ran the ______________ … We called him doctor death.
  8. Helena Christensen: You know what is strange about this photo? I don’t even know where I took it and the negative was ______________ together with a piece of paper so when I _______ it ____________ obviously all that white stuff which looks like ice on a window […].
  9. Helena Christensen: We don’t live in these areas so we are not ______________ the same ways. When you are in it, you feel it in a way that’s inexplicable.
  10. Helena Christensen: And it was one of those moments when you are like … your adrenaline … just … you know … __________ ________, because you’re like … oh, this is one of those.
  11. HelenaChristensen: It’s very harsh as Mary Ellen was saying. People are very ______________, more and more.
  12. Helena Christensen: That’s kind of what I feel you do with your portraits. You get the ___________ essence of these people no matter of how they are dressed up, no matter how they’re made up. You go right through to the _____________ of them.
  13. Mary Ellen Mark: When you are working with an actor you have to __________ control.
  14. Mary Ellen Mark: I think I have so much stronger pictures. For some reason, that picture became an ____________ picture.
  15. Helena Christensen: It’s very important and I feel with contact sheets which we are now losing because no one ever get contact sheets back anymore and sits with 24 or 26 images. But now that I _______ __ _____ at my old contact sheets, I see something completely different in some of the photographs that I would have never even … you know … been the least excited about maybe fifteen years ago …I’m now … Why didn’t I __________ this up?!?
  16. Mary Ellen Mark: Right when I was taking that picture the ____________ of the high school walked in … I thought he was gonna like throw me out … But he didn’t.

Downloadable PDF file (without answers):Helena Christensen & Portrait Photographer Mary Ellen Mark Capture™ – Episode 7 FILL IN THE GAPS

Downloadable PDF file (ANSWERS):Helena Christensen & Portrait Photographer Mary Ellen Mark Capture™ – Episode 7 ANSWERS

“To drop the ball” – English idiom

To drop the ball.jpg

More example sentences from the web:

  • You can’t trust Monica to do the job right. She‘s always dropping the ball.

  • Honey, I totally dropped the ball on Chuck’s present to Sarah.

  • Every time I depend on you, you drop the ball.

drop the ball synonyms

Visual Thesaurus