Pronouns in English – I

Pronouns_in_English_mind_mapYou can download this mind map as imx. file on Biggerplate or as pronouns_in_english_mind_map file.

Pronouns_in_English

TO END vs TO FINISH – Collocations in English

To_end_vs_to_finishBased on: McCarthy, M. O’Dell, F. (2008), Collocations in use, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

TO END

  • To stop with a clear conclusion. We use it when there’s an important change.
    Example: World War II ended in 1945.
  • END can’t be followed by either the infinitive (to- form) or the -ing form.
    Example: Mark ended drying his hair. => This sentence isn’t correct!
    The correct sentence is: Mark finished drying his hair.

TO FINISH

  • To bring something to an end.
    Example: Are you sure you’ll finish your essay by Monday?
  • To eat, drink the last of something.
    Example: I’m sorry, I just finished the coffee.
  • It can be followed by the -ing form, but not by the infinitive.
    Example: They have finished to play. => This sentence is not correct!
    The correct sentence is: They have finished playing.

“Come” – Phrasal verbs

Come_01

Conjugation of “TO COME“. (link)

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB

COME ALONG => Arrive at a place
Go now and I will come along later.
– He decided to give the money to the first stranger who came along.
– Even if another job comes along this summer, I won’t take it.

COME OUT => Disappear or become less strong (of dirt or colour on clothing/material)
– We scrubbed the carpet with soap but the stains still wouldn’t come out.
Let your dress soak overnight and the stain will probably come out.

COME OUT => Become public knowledge after it has been kept secret (of the truth)
The truth is beginning to come out about what happened.
– The news of her death came out last week.

COME OUT OF => Leave after a period in a place (of hospital/prison)
– After three years, she came out of the coma.
– Mandela came out of prison after 27 years of captivity.
– The criminal came out of the house with arms raised.

COME OUT => Be given to people (of results or information)
– When do your exam results come out?
– Elections were held in Albania on 2 July and the results came out on 2 September.

COME APART => Separate into pieces
– It came apart when I tried to lift it off the floor and I had to glue it back together.
– The artery that is bringing blood to your brain, it’s coming apart.
– The doll just came apart when touched.

COME AROUND/ROUND => Become conscious again
– The unconscious patient finally came around.
– My sister was with me when I came round after the operation.

Here you can download the mind map (imx file).


Come2

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB

COME ABOUT => Happen, especially something that is not planned
– How did such a mess come about, anyway?
– How did this quarrel come about?
– I truly believe that the integration of the European Union cannot come about if we do not proceed rapidly to unify rules relating to justice.

COME OFF => Happen successfully, or as planned
I was surprised when the plan came off so easily.
– To everybody’s astonishment, the scheme came off.
– She didn’t come off well in that interview.

COME UP => Mentioned or discussed
Your name came up in conversation.
–  If the subject of Nobel Prizes comes up, maybe you could drop something about my nomination.

COME UP => Happened unexpectedly, usually a problem or difficult situation
– I’ll be late home tonight because something’s come up at work has to be ready for tomorrow morning.
– I’m sorry, but something came up at home and I couldn’t finish my homework.
– I’m the one who promised to take her to the theater, but then something came up.

COME UP=> Become available
– And when the PE vacancy came up, she suggested Jason.
– Now, there had been some rumors that if a vacancy came up on the Supreme Court, that LBJ might appoint me.
– A full-time opening came up, and Jack gave the job to his son.

 

Here you can download this mind map (imx file).

Come_03

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB

COME UP AGAINST => Encountered or have to deal with (a difficult situation)
– The negotiations came up against stumbling blocks on several points.
– I’ve never come up against anything I can’t handle.
– Two years ago, the Amsterdam Council already came up against this problem and did not manage to solve it.

COME TO => Make (a decision about something)
I’ve got to come to a decision.
– Everybody in the school comes to that conclusion?
– In 1992, the French came to a decision on the basis of spurious information.

COME ACROSS => Discover (or met) by chance
–  I came across my old school reports when I was clearing out my desk.
– Recently, I’ve come across some useful information.
– He’s the most brilliant student I’ve come across.

COME DOWN TO => Depend mostly on or be influenced most by
I guess in the end my decision will come down to what my professor recommends.
– It all comes down to a question of who tries hardest.

Here you can download this mind map (imx file).

Agreeing or disagreeing in English – Second version

Someone asked me to make this mind map with a bigger font size. On my computer, I created it as imx file (you can download it from biggerplate.com).Unfortunately, only with iMindmap you can read imx files and I know that not everyone has it. The only thing I can do with mind maps is to use a screen capture program and post them as images. Unfortunately, when I make big mind maps, with a lot of branches, I can’t use a big font size. Consequently, some people could find it difficult to read them. What I can do for them is to write as a normal post what is written in the mind map. If you have any other suggestion, I always welcome new ideas ;-).

By the way, if you click on the mind map image you have the possibility to zoom a little bit.

Agreeing_or_disagreeing_in_English_002

AGREEING OR DISAGREEING IN ENGLISH

Simple agreement:

  • I agree with you.
  • Tell me about it! (slang)
  • I have to side with you/him/her /them … on this one.
  • I think you are right.
  • Yes, and …
  • That’s exactly how I feel.
  • You have a point there.
  • I accept your point.

Partly agreeing

  • I agree with you in principle, but …
  • That’s quite true, but …
  • I agree with you up to a point, but …

Agreeing strongly

  • You’re absolutely right.
  • I totally agree.
  • I couldn’t agree with you more.
  • I completely agree.
  • I agree entirely.
  • I agree with you 100 percent.
  • That’s so true.

Disagreeing

  • I disagree.
  • I’m not sure I agree with you.
  • I don’t agree.
  • That’s not always the case.
  • Yes, but …
  • I don’t share your opinion.
  • I can’t agree with you.
  • I think we’re going to have to agree to disagree.
  • I beg to differ.
  • That’s not always true.

Disagreeing strongly

  • I don’t agree at all.
  • No way.
  • I couldn’t agree with you less.
  • I totally disagree.
  • I really can’t agree with you there.
  • I’d say the exact opposite.
  • You’ve got to be kidding!
  • You’re dead wrong.
  • You’re way wrong.
  • I can’t find myself to agree with you.

You’ll sound more polite by using a phrase such as “I’m afraid …” or “I’m sorry but …” before disagreeing or disagreeing strongly.