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PAST SIMPLE – WHEN TO USE IT + SPELLING RULES

We use this tense:

  • to talk about events or actions that happened in the past which have no connection to the present:
    Ex. She wrote the letter on Wednesday(Today is Monday)
  • to talk about a finished action in someone’s life:
    Ex. Mary’s uncle went to Spain twice.  (Mary’s uncle is dead)
  • to tell a story or a series of single past completed events or actions:
    Ex. I went to the library, thenlooked for the books I needed to write the essay, I read them, and, finally, I started writing it.
  • to talk about habits in the past:
    Ex. When I was a teenager I visited my uncle twice a week.
  • to talk about past facts or generalisations:
    Ex. People paid much more to make cell phone calls in the past.
  • with a finished time word (yesterday, last week, last month, in 2002, etc.) but no time reference is necessary if it is already known:
  • Ex. It was very cold yesterday.
  • to talk about long-term situations in the past which are no longer true:
    Ex. She worked at the hospital for over fifteen years.

SIMPLE PAST spelling rules (1).png

C= CONSONANT      V = VOWEL

 

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HIGHER EDUCATION – Listening activity

This video is hilarious but at the same time, it reveals a view of our times that I find realistic. It is about the amount of money people spend in order to get an education. They feel it is essential because “What kind of job can you get without a proper education, without a degree?”

It is true, in most cases, you will end up unemployed, with a loan to pay out and frustrated. But then, it is up to you. If you are a creative and brilliant person, you will find a way to make a use of the knowledge you acquired, the education you paid for. You cannot find everything on the Internet. I believe the Internet is like an ocean of information, if you do not know how to swim, if you do not know how to row, you will not go far, you will drown.

Higher education gives you a kind of awareness, it gives you the oars which are vital when you know how to use them. At university you learn critical thinking, you have the possibility to meet like-minded people. Chances are, you will also meet teachers that will not be able to arouse your curiosity, arrogant and with narrow minds, or not able to do their jobs. But if you are lucky, you will meet teachers able to guide you. When you become acquainted with these wise individuals, then it will be worth it and it will change your life.

I agree with this man regarding the amount of money we have to pay in order to get an education which I find excessive too. Education should be free, or at least accessible to those deserving it, those willing to commit to studying hard in order to expand their views, to increase their possibilities. 

Then, there is nothing wrong in deciding not to carry on studying after high school, practical jobs are not useless, quite the contrary. We should have the possibility to decide what is the best option for us, depending on our skills, strengths and aims in life.

If you work hard, you like your job and you find it rewarding, you are lucky, not to be judged because you do not have a degree. Being smart has nothing to do with a certificate, with a piece of paper. 

I suggest that you read the vocabulary list before watching the video. 

HIGHER EDUCATION

VOCABULARY

To declare: to say or state (something) in an official or public way.

Innate: a quality you were born with, not one you have learned.

Dependent: decided or controlled by something else — on or upon.

To achieve: to succeed in finishing something or reaching an aim, especially after a lot of work or effort.

Tuition: the act of teaching something, especially to one person or to people in small groups.

Loan: an amount of money that is given to someone for a period of time with a promise that it will be paid back.

To afford: to be able to buy or do something because you have enough money or time.

Purveyor: a person or business that sells or provides something.

Wisdom: knowledge that is gained by having many experiences in life.

Elder: used to refer to the older of two people (such as a father and son) who have the same name; a person who has authority because of age and experience.

Sage: someone, especially an old man, who is very wise.

To set apart: (phrasal verb, separable) to be a quality that makes (someone or something) better than or different from other people or things — usuallyfrom.

Buggy: a light carriage pulled by a horse. buggy-2027141_1280.png

Hire: to employ someone; to give work or a job to (someone) in exchange for wages or a salary.

Entrepreneur: someone who starts a new business and is willing to risk loss in order to make money.

To let go:  to make someone leave their job.

To lack: to not have something that you need, or not have enough of it.

Prospects: chances of future success.

Interactive fill in the gaps exercise:

https://www.onlineexambuilder.com/verb-tenses-fill-in-the-gaps-exercise/exam-166046

Downloadable PDF (with answers): HIGHER EDUCATION – fill in the gaps exercise

Listening activity – Irish (Advanced) – C1

INTERMISSION (2003)

Fill in the gaps in the following sentences

  1. I want you to stay out of ____________________.
  2. I mean, he _________________ me, ma, breaks my heart …
  3. I saw her kissing some _________________
  4. So we hold the _________________ hostage, _________________ our identity.
  5. But _________________, man, it’s not about the money.
  6. And I wouldn’t recommend you get _________________, either.
  7. You and me. _____________ to ____________.
  8. Get ___________ of that old Ronnie you’re cultivating.
  9. Have I got a _________________ like?
  10. Step on the _________________ so I can climb back.

FIVE MINUTES OF HEAVEN (2009)

Fill in the gaps in the following sentences

  1.  I was 15 when I _________________ the UVF, the Ulster Volunteer Force.
  2. At that time there were _________ on the street, every week _________ bombs every day.
  3. And it was like we were under _________.
  4. You have to understand the ____________________.
  5. This is about men who have ___________________ the men they have ___________________ that you have become or something I don’t know.
  6. We want you to meet the man who ____________ your brother, face to face.
  7. He’s always there in my ___________ and I don’t know where to go.
  8. This is the question we all _____________________ the answer to. Truth and reconciliation.
  9. What’s at ___________? Is it possible?
  10. “Time will ___________, they say.” But the years just get heavier.
  11. The man shot my brother ___________ times in the head. The man is having the life of Riley.
  12. Do I _______________ his hand or do I kill him?

THE MIGHTY CELT (2005)

Fill in the gaps in the following sentences

  1. Do you wanna a ___________?
  2. What about this one Joe? He will be a champion. And he’s got ___________
  3. If I ___________ him to win, can I keep him?
  4. It’s like a __________________, get on.
  5. Don’t tell me … You asked her to get ______________________?

PDF version: Listening activity – Trailers – Irish – Advanced – femfy

Answers: Listening activity – Trailers – Answers – femfy

The TO-INFINITIVE and -ING (part 1)

When one verb is followed by another, we use the -ing form or the infinitive (with or without to. The form of the second verb depends on the first verb ;-).

Let’s learn them!

I hope this post helps you :-). 

verb + to infinitive English Grammar femfy Free English Materials For You.png

PDF version: verb+ to infinitive

I suggest that you take a look at Biggerplate.com for other amazing and informative mind maps!

VERB + TO INFINITIVE

  • (CAN/CAN’T) AFFORD
  • AGREE*
  • AIM
  • APPEAR
  • ARRANGE*
  • ATTEMPT
  • CHOOSE
  • DECIDE*
  • DEMAND*
  • DESERVE
  • FAIL
  • HOPE*
  • LEARN
  • MANAGE
  • NEGLECT
  • OFFER
  • OMIT
  • PLAN
  • PREPARE
  • PRETEND*
  • REFUSE
  • SEEM
  • TEND
  • THREATEN
  • (CAN’T) WAIT
  • WISH

Examples:

  • She can’t afford to lose that vote.
  • They agree to leave at 10:30 am.
  • * They agree (that) they would leave at 10:30 am.
  • We aim to launch next year.
  • Keep me posted on what you decide to do.
  • Your actions threaten to destroy everything we’ve worked for.

verb + object + to infinitive english grammar learning femfy.png

PDF version: verb + object + to infinitive

VERB + OBJECT + TO INFINITIVE

  • ADVISE *
  • ALLOW
  • ENCOURAGE
  • FORBID
  • FORCE
  • INVITE
  • ORDER 
  • PERMIT
  • PERSUADE*
  • REMIND*
  • TEACH*
  • TELL*
  • WARN*

Examples:

  • We would advise you to follow the same path.
  • The Administrative Board invites observers to attend its meetings.
  • We were trying to persuade the witness to testify.

Advise, allow, encourage, forbid and permit can be followed by -ING too when there is no object.

  • I would advise following the same path.
  • We do not allow smoking.

verb + (object) + to infinitive.png

PDF version: verbs + (object) + to infinitive

VERB + (OBJECT) + TO INFINITIVE

  • ASK
  • BEG
  • EXPECT*
  • HELP
  • INTEND
  • PROMISE
  • WANT

Examples:

  • I didn’t ask to work here.
  • I didn’t ask you to work here.
  • She begged him to read the story again.
  • We expect the economy to improve.
  • * We expect (that) the economy will improve.

verb + infinitive (without to)

PDF version: verb + infinitive (without to)

VERB + INFINITIVE (without to)

  • MODAL VERBS: can, could, may, might, must, needn’t, shall, should, will, would.
  • HELP (can be followed by the infinitive with or without to).
  • MAKE and LET (+ OBJECT) are always followed by the infinitive without TO.

Examples:

  • You can borrow my shirt.
  • She might go to Paris.
  • She helped (to) organise the party.
  • Don’t make me add this to the list.
  • After you finish, let the students copy it.

 

 

IELTS Academic – Writing Task 1

The international English language testing system (IELTS) is the world’s most popular English language proficiency test for higher education and global migration.

The Academic Module consists of 3 parts:

  • Academic Reading: 3 different texts (40 questions) – 1 hour;
  • Academic Writing: 2 separate writing tasks – 1 hour;
  • Listening: 4 separate sections (40 questions) – 30 minutes + 10 minutes to transfer your answers;
  • Speaking: 3 parts – 11-14 minutes.

ACADEMIC IELTS – WRITING TASK 1

You should spend about 20 minutes on task 1, writing at least 150 words. Writing task 2 is longer and more demanding. This is why you should spend about 40 minutes on task 2, which is worth twice as much as task 1. You are required to write a discursive essay of at least 250 words.

In task 1, you are required to describe and summarise visual information. The information may be presented in:

ACADEMIC IELTS - DESCRIBING GRAPHS TABLES DIAGRAMS CHARTS - WRITING TASK 1 femfy free english materials fo

You will be assessed on the following criteria:

  • Task achievement;
  • Coherence and cohesion;
  • Lexical resource;
  • Grammatical range and accuracy.

Quiz on passive voice