“Come” – Phrasal verbs

Come_01

Conjugation of “TO COME“. (link)

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB

COME ALONG => Arrive at a place
Go now and I will come along later.
– He decided to give the money to the first stranger who came along.
– Even if another job comes along this summer, I won’t take it.

COME OUT => Disappear or become less strong (of dirt or colour on clothing/material)
– We scrubbed the carpet with soap but the stains still wouldn’t come out.
Let your dress soak overnight and the stain will probably come out.

COME OUT => Become public knowledge after it has been kept secret (of the truth)
The truth is beginning to come out about what happened.
– The news of her death came out last week.

COME OUT OF => Leave after a period in a place (of hospital/prison)
– After three years, she came out of the coma.
– Mandela came out of prison after 27 years of captivity.
– The criminal came out of the house with arms raised.

COME OUT => Be given to people (of results or information)
– When do your exam results come out?
– Elections were held in Albania on 2 July and the results came out on 2 September.

COME APART => Separate into pieces
– It came apart when I tried to lift it off the floor and I had to glue it back together.
– The artery that is bringing blood to your brain, it’s coming apart.
– The doll just came apart when touched.

COME AROUND/ROUND => Become conscious again
– The unconscious patient finally came around.
– My sister was with me when I came round after the operation.

Here you can download the mind map (imx file).


Come2

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB

COME ABOUT => Happen, especially something that is not planned
– How did such a mess come about, anyway?
– How did this quarrel come about?
– I truly believe that the integration of the European Union cannot come about if we do not proceed rapidly to unify rules relating to justice.

COME OFF => Happen successfully, or as planned
I was surprised when the plan came off so easily.
– To everybody’s astonishment, the scheme came off.
– She didn’t come off well in that interview.

COME UP => Mentioned or discussed
Your name came up in conversation.
–  If the subject of Nobel Prizes comes up, maybe you could drop something about my nomination.

COME UP => Happened unexpectedly, usually a problem or difficult situation
– I’ll be late home tonight because something’s come up at work has to be ready for tomorrow morning.
– I’m sorry, but something came up at home and I couldn’t finish my homework.
– I’m the one who promised to take her to the theater, but then something came up.

COME UP=> Become available
– And when the PE vacancy came up, she suggested Jason.
– Now, there had been some rumors that if a vacancy came up on the Supreme Court, that LBJ might appoint me.
– A full-time opening came up, and Jack gave the job to his son.

 

Here you can download this mind map (imx file).

Come_03

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB

COME UP AGAINST => Encountered or have to deal with (a difficult situation)
– The negotiations came up against stumbling blocks on several points.
– I’ve never come up against anything I can’t handle.
– Two years ago, the Amsterdam Council already came up against this problem and did not manage to solve it.

COME TO => Make (a decision about something)
I’ve got to come to a decision.
– Everybody in the school comes to that conclusion?
– In 1992, the French came to a decision on the basis of spurious information.

COME ACROSS => Discover (or met) by chance
–  I came across my old school reports when I was clearing out my desk.
– Recently, I’ve come across some useful information.
– He’s the most brilliant student I’ve come across.

COME DOWN TO => Depend mostly on or be influenced most by
I guess in the end my decision will come down to what my professor recommends.
– It all comes down to a question of who tries hardest.

Here you can download this mind map (imx file).

Agreeing or disagreeing in English – Second version

Someone asked me to make this mind map with a bigger font size. On my computer, I created it as imx file (you can download it from biggerplate.com).Unfortunately, only with iMindmap you can read imx files and I know that not everyone has it. The only thing I can do with mind maps is to use a screen capture program and post them as images. Unfortunately, when I make big mind maps, with a lot of branches, I can’t use a big font size. Consequently, some people could find it difficult to read them. What I can do for them is to write as a normal post what is written in the mind map. If you have any other suggestion, I always welcome new ideas ;-).

By the way, if you click on the mind map image you have the possibility to zoom a little bit.

Agreeing_or_disagreeing_in_English_002

AGREEING OR DISAGREEING IN ENGLISH

Simple agreement:

  • I agree with you.
  • Tell me about it! (slang)
  • I have to side with you/him/her /them … on this one.
  • I think you are right.
  • Yes, and …
  • That’s exactly how I feel.
  • You have a point there.
  • I accept your point.

Partly agreeing

  • I agree with you in principle, but …
  • That’s quite true, but …
  • I agree with you up to a point, but …

Agreeing strongly

  • You’re absolutely right.
  • I totally agree.
  • I couldn’t agree with you more.
  • I completely agree.
  • I agree entirely.
  • I agree with you 100 percent.
  • That’s so true.

Disagreeing

  • I disagree.
  • I’m not sure I agree with you.
  • I don’t agree.
  • That’s not always the case.
  • Yes, but …
  • I don’t share your opinion.
  • I can’t agree with you.
  • I think we’re going to have to agree to disagree.
  • I beg to differ.
  • That’s not always true.

Disagreeing strongly

  • I don’t agree at all.
  • No way.
  • I couldn’t agree with you less.
  • I totally disagree.
  • I really can’t agree with you there.
  • I’d say the exact opposite.
  • You’ve got to be kidding!
  • You’re dead wrong.
  • You’re way wrong.
  • I can’t find myself to agree with you.

You’ll sound more polite by using a phrase such as “I’m afraid …” or “I’m sorry but …” before disagreeing or disagreeing strongly.

“To dispense” – What does it mean?

To_dispense You can download or share this mind map also from biggerplate: http://www.biggerplate.com/mindmaps/AmtxUlrq/to-dispense .

In “My Reverie” , a 1938 popular song, you can hear “dispense with”.

This is the lyrics:

Our love is a dream, but in my reverie
I can see that this love was meant for me

Only a poor fool never schooled in the whirlpool
Of romance could be so cruel as you are to me
My dreams are as worthless as tin to me

Without you life will never begin to be
So love me as I love you in my reverie
Make my dream a reality
Let’s dispense with formality
Come to me in my reverie

Our love is a dream, but in my reverie
I can see that this love was meant for me
Only a poor fool never schooled in the whirlpool
Of romance could be so cruel as you are to me

My dreams are as worthless as tin to me
Without you life will never begin to be

So love me as I love you in my reverie
Make my dream a reality
Let’s dispense with formality
Come to me in my reverie
My reverie

Here you can find other examples: http://corpus.byu.edu/coca/ .

In this song, you can hear how to pronounce “to dispense with”:

I can see that this love was meant for me
Only a poor fool never schooled in the whirlpool
Of romance could be so cruel as you are to me
My dreams are as worthless as tin to me
Without you life will never begin to be
So love me as I love you in my reverie
Make my dream a reality
Let’s dispense with formality
Come to me in my reverie