“To hit the hay” – English idiom

to hit the hay - English idiom meaning - Free English Materials For You - femfy.jpg

Image source: 1; 2.

Another way to say it is TO HIT THE SACK ;-).

This is a nice comic on this idiom made by Ploopikoosy:

hit-the-hay.png

More example sentences from the web:

  • I have a busy day tomorrow, so I think I’ll hit the hay.
  • Time to go home and hit the hay!
  • I’m tired, I’m gonna hit the hay.
  • Well, I’m going to hit the hay, I’m feeling pretty tired. Good night!

Here, you can read about the origin of this idiom: The meaning and origin of the expression: Hit the hay

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“Cock up” – British slang

cock up meaning - English slang - Free English Materials For You.jpg

Example sentences from the web:

  • The whole affair was a monumental cock-up from start to finish.
  • Nothing goes right, it’s just one cock-up after another!
  • I cocked up the orders for table number four.

*Notice that this expression isn’t commonly used in the USA, where it is generally assumed to have a vulgar meaning.

“To steal someone’s thunder” – English proverb

To steal someone's thunder meaning - Englishvocabulary - English Proverb - Free English Materials For You.jpg
Example sentences from the web:

– Mike stole my thunder when he said he had done all the work. That isn’t  true. In fact, I did most of it!
– What do you mean by coming in here and stealing my thunder? I’m in charge here!
– She stole my thunder, just like she stole last week’s pantsuit design from Versace.

to steal someone's thunder meaning.jpg

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Pixton_Comic_Steal_someone_s_thunder_by_bloomsbury.png

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stealsomeonesthunder.gif

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Post & articles on the web with his saying (click on the images to read the whole post/article):

steal someone's thunder learning Enlgish

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“To juggle” – What does it mean?

 

To juggle meaning - Englishvocabulary - Free English Materials For You (2).jpg

Image 1 source; image 2 source

Example sentences from the web:

  • Many parents find it hard to juggle children and career. (meaning 2)
  • Charles juggled five tangerines! (meaning 1)
  • Mark learnt to juggle five balls at once. (meaning 1)
  • Sarah was hired as an administrator for her ability to juggle many tasks at once. (meaning 2)

 

“For good” – English idiom

For good - English Iidom - Free English Materials For You.jpg

Image source

Example sentences from the web:

  • Marcus: “When is Lucy coming back?”
    Brenda: “She is not coming back. She is gone for good.”
  • His severe injury ended his career for good.
  • I was afraid you had disappeared for good.