“To fancy” – English slang

To fancy someone

Example sentences from the web:

  • The thing is, you marry a woman you fancy.
  • Did you fancy anyone?
  • No, I do not fancy Miss Pattman and I will not have her disrespected in this way.

Notice that in British English “to fancy” means also “to like something”:

If you both fancy the dress, you’ll just have to share and wear it one after the other.

“To waffle” – British slang

To waffleImage source

Probably you knew already the common meaning of “waffle” in British and American English. If you didn’t … this is a “waffle”:
waffle

A “waffle” is a type of pancake with a pattern of square dents in it, made in a waffle iron.

According to Random House Dictionary waffle with the British English meaning of talking idly, and foolishly without purpose is derived from waff (which means to bark or to yelp like a dog) and first appeared in print between 1695-1705.

Example sentences from the web:

  • She waffled when asked what she thought of her sister’s new boyfriend.
  • If you don’t know the answer, it’s no good just waffling (on) for pages and pages.

From a British newspaper clipping (1957):
newspaper - to waffle

Image source

Remember that in American slang the meaning of “to waffle” is different.
Example sentences from the web:

  • American voters waffled in 2000.
  • He waffled on an important issue.
    [= to fail to make up one’s mind; to equivocate; to waver; to oscillate between options].

“A hoodie” – English slang

a_hoodie

A “hoodie” is also any person that lives or came from the hood (the ghetto).

Example sentences from the web:

  • There was a hoodie watching us. 
  • I just keep seeing that faceless person in the black hoodie.
  • Yall seen dem hoodies shooting dice in da cut back there?? F*ck, I think we back in da ghetto yall…
  • Don’t go near that hoodie, he’ll blow your kneecaps off.

“Bloke” – British slang

bloke

Other examples from the web:

  • You blame that bloke for your situation.
  • You look like the bloke from Stranger Danger posters.
  • Who’s that bloke with the funny sunglasses sitting on the plush lounge next to Susan?
  • He’s a funny bloke.
  • I was told you had more imagination than other blokes in the big firms.

Terms you may not know:

TO BLAME = to hold responsible; to find fault with.
PLUSH = expensive and luxurious.
LOUNGE = waiting room; casual bar (hotel).
FIRMa partnership or association for carrying on a business.