Get along

to-get-along-meaning-phrasal-verb-femfy-free-english-materials-for-you

More example sentences:

  • I don’t get along with Sebastian, we have nothing in common!
  • The reason you don’t get along is because you have different values.
  • I like her so much! We are getting along well.

Another meaning of ‘TO GET ALONG’ is ‘to manage’, ‘to cope’, ‘to make progress while doing something’.

Example sentences:

  • I’m not getting along well with my schoolwork. I need to work harder.
  • How are you getting along with your work?
  • I just can’t get along without a secretary.

SYNONYMS:

to-get-along-synonyms

Source

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Get rid of

to-get-rid-of-meaning-phrasal-verb-femfy-free-english-materials-for-you

‘Get rid of’ is an INSEPARABLE phrasal verb.

Example sentences:

  • She’s trying to get rid of us.
  • I can’t get rid of my phone until John calls.
  • I just can’t bring myself to get rid of this old dress because it has so many good memories attached to it.

 

 

To go – Phrasal verbs

go_pv_mind_map

You can download this mind map (imx. file) on Biggerplate.

EXAMPLE SENTENCES FROM THE WEB:

  • GO FOR
    1) To be attracted to; to have an interest in.
    You and me … We go for the bad boys.
    – He tends to go for girls like her.
    2) To attack.
     The neighbour’s dog went for the postman and bit him.
    – He is known to go for the jugular in arguments.
    3) To seek to obtain; to choose.
    – I think they would go for that kind of centralization.
    – I could really go for some hot wings.
  • GO THROUGH
    1) To bear; to experience a difficult/unpleasant situation.
    – Nobody would want to go through something like that.
    – In Malta, my fellow workers are going through disastrous changes.
    2) To examine the contents of something carefully.
    – We need to go through every message and assess the damage.
     That subpoena gives us the right to go through your files.
  • GO IN FOR
    1) To occupy oneself with; to engage in
    She goes in for volleyball.
    We have responded more to the will of our citizens and have been that much less inclined to go in for big events.
    – This will enable our students to go in for a three-year degree, in Italian, directly from Cairo and also take the exams in Egypt.
    2) To have or show an interest in or liking for.
    I thought you didn’t go in for those kinds of shenanigans.
    I don’t go in for those modern things.
    3) To enter a competition or to take an examination.
    My brother decided to cheer himself up by going in for a competition. The prize was a luxury holiday in the Caribbean.
    – He went in for the photography prize but didn’t win.
    – His school had suggested he go in for the Young Musician of the Year competition.
  • GO WITHOUT
    To be denied or deprived of something
    If you don’t like your tea, you can go without.
    She has had to go without a holiday for several years now.
    There were days I knew he went without food to buy music paper.
  • GO ABOUT
    1) To occupy oneself with; to perform
    – Meanwhile, the unsuspecting citizens of Coruscant go about their daily lives.
    – The shoemaker goes about his work with a smile.
    2) To begin to do
    We went about getting evidence of what was going on.
    How can I go about getting a good idea?
  • GO THROUGH WITH
    To stay with (something) to the end even if it’s something unpleasant or difficult.
    She went through with the divorce.
    We’re going to use him to go through with the transaction.
    Now you won’t have to go through with all that mess.
  • GO OFF
    1) To explode, or to make a loud noise.
    The bomb could go off at any moment.
    – The Hulk is a bomb waiting to go off.
    2) To leave suddenly.
    John went off with the money.
    Brian is going off to Milan and we’re throwing him a farewell party.
    3) To become angry quickly.
    He went off in a flash when he heard the news. I’ve never seen him so upset.
    4) To cease to be available, running, or functioning (of a light, electricity, or heating); to stop.
    The generator went off and we can’t get it started again.
    – The lights go off every six minutes, you know, to save electricity and stuff.

    5) To begin (with alarms, or signals).
    My alarm clock didn’t go off today and that’s why I was late.
    My alarm clock went off at 7:00 a.m.
    – It’s programmed to go off before you do.

    6) To follow the expected or desired course; to occur specified.
    The party went off well.
    7) To go bad; to decay.
    Something has gone off in the fridge, there’s a horrible smell.
    – The food went off very quickly, we had to throw it all.
  • GO ON
    1) To happen or take place.
    What’s going on at school?
    What’s going on outside? All your friends are out in the street carrying placards.
    2) To continue; to proceed; to keep on.
    Please, go on. Don’t let me interrupt you.
    Go on, tell me what happened next.

    3) To start running or functioning (of power, water supply, etc.)
    – The alarm goes on when you close the front door.
    4) To act or behave.
    – Don’t go on like that; stop kicking the dog.
  • GO ALONG WITH
    To agree with someone’s opinion/decision; to support an idea.
    I said it wouldn’t work. I didn’t go along with it from the beginning.
    – She’s still angry with me for going along with your idea.
  • GO TOGETHER
    1) To have a romantic relationship (informal).
    Are Mark and Mary still going together?
    They had been going together for years.
    2) To look or taste good when experienced at the same time (items of clothing, furniture or food).
    – Fish and red wine don’t go together.
    – Drinking and driving don’t go together.

I made this quiz for you :-), it will take you no more than 15 minutes. Try it out to check your knowledge about this topic.

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“Come” – Phrasal verbs

Come_01

Conjugation of “TO COME“. (link)

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB

COME ALONG => Arrive at a place
Go now and I will come along later.
– He decided to give the money to the first stranger who came along.
– Even if another job comes along this summer, I won’t take it.

COME OUT => Disappear or become less strong (of dirt or colour on clothing/material)
– We scrubbed the carpet with soap but the stains still wouldn’t come out.
Let your dress soak overnight and the stain will probably come out.

COME OUT => Become public knowledge after it has been kept secret (of the truth)
The truth is beginning to come out about what happened.
– The news of her death came out last week.

COME OUT OF => Leave after a period in a place (of hospital/prison)
– After three years, she came out of the coma.
– Mandela came out of prison after 27 years of captivity.
– The criminal came out of the house with arms raised.

COME OUT => Be given to people (of results or information)
– When do your exam results come out?
– Elections were held in Albania on 2 July and the results came out on 2 September.

COME APART => Separate into pieces
– It came apart when I tried to lift it off the floor and I had to glue it back together.
– The artery that is bringing blood to your brain, it’s coming apart.
– The doll just came apart when touched.

COME AROUND/ROUND => Become conscious again
– The unconscious patient finally came around.
– My sister was with me when I came round after the operation.

Here you can download the mind map (imx file).


Come2

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB

COME ABOUT => Happen, especially something that is not planned
– How did such a mess come about, anyway?
– How did this quarrel come about?
– I truly believe that the integration of the European Union cannot come about if we do not proceed rapidly to unify rules relating to justice.

COME OFF => Happen successfully, or as planned
I was surprised when the plan came off so easily.
– To everybody’s astonishment, the scheme came off.
– She didn’t come off well in that interview.

COME UP => Mentioned or discussed
Your name came up in conversation.
–  If the subject of Nobel Prizes comes up, maybe you could drop something about my nomination.

COME UP => Happened unexpectedly, usually a problem or difficult situation
– I’ll be late home tonight because something’s come up at work has to be ready for tomorrow morning.
– I’m sorry, but something came up at home and I couldn’t finish my homework.
– I’m the one who promised to take her to the theater, but then something came up.

COME UP=> Become available
– And when the PE vacancy came up, she suggested Jason.
– Now, there had been some rumors that if a vacancy came up on the Supreme Court, that LBJ might appoint me.
– A full-time opening came up, and Jack gave the job to his son.

 

Here you can download this mind map (imx file).

Come_03

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB

COME UP AGAINST => Encountered or have to deal with (a difficult situation)
– The negotiations came up against stumbling blocks on several points.
– I’ve never come up against anything I can’t handle.
– Two years ago, the Amsterdam Council already came up against this problem and did not manage to solve it.

COME TO => Make (a decision about something)
I’ve got to come to a decision.
– Everybody in the school comes to that conclusion?
– In 1992, the French came to a decision on the basis of spurious information.

COME ACROSS => Discover (or met) by chance
–  I came across my old school reports when I was clearing out my desk.
– Recently, I’ve come across some useful information.
– He’s the most brilliant student I’ve come across.

COME DOWN TO => Depend mostly on or be influenced most by
I guess in the end my decision will come down to what my professor recommends.
– It all comes down to a question of who tries hardest.

Here you can download this mind map (imx file).

Telephone – phrasal verbs

telephone_Phrasal_verbs

Here you can download the imx file: http://www.biggerplate.com/mindmaps/TdstKce8/telephone-phrasal-verbs#

Take the quiz: Phrasal verbs related to a phone call

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